2017

  • [DOI] M. W. Maier, S. Erhard, M. Niklasch, T. Bruckner, S. I. Wolf, F. Zeifang, and P. Raiss: „Three-dimensional motion analysis for validation of shoulder internal rotation,“ Arch orthop trauma surg, 2017.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{maier_three-dimensional_2017,
    title = {Three-dimensional motion analysis for validation of shoulder internal rotation},
    issn = {0936-8051},
    doi = {10.1007/s00402-017-2656-4},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: 10\% of the points for the Constant-Murley score (CMS) are allocated for the capacity for internal rotation (IR), measured as unassisted active movement of the dorsum of the hand or the thumb to reach different anatomical landmarks. However, there is little information about the validity of this method and no three-dimensional measurement of the degree of IR that is necessary to reach these landmarks. METHODS: Sixteen volunteers with healthy shoulders were recruited. The degree of IR was defined using the following landmarks as described in the CMS: (1) lateral aspect of thigh, (2) buttock, (3) sacroiliac joint, (4) level of waist, (5) vertebra T12, (6) interscapular. The validity of IR measurement was assessed by simultaneous 3D motion analysis. RESULTS: Using the thumb as pointer, there were significant increases in IR from 39.3 degrees at position 1 to 80.4 degrees at position 2, followed by 105.1 degrees , 108.6 degrees , 110.1 degrees , and 125.3 degrees at position 3-6. Taking the dorsum of the hand as pointer, there were significant increases in IR between all positions, starting from 71.2 degrees (position 1) and followed by 99.3 degrees , 104.1 degrees , 110.3 degrees , 115.2 degrees , and 119.7 degrees at positions 2 to 6. Comparing the two measurement methods, a significant difference was found for the amount of IR between positions 1 and 2. CONCLUSION: Measurement of IR as described in the CMS is a suitable method. However, there was an increase of only 10 degrees in IR between positions 3 and 5, which may be hard to measure with a standard goniometer in clinical practice.},
    language = {eng},
    journal = {Arch Orthop Trauma Surg},
    author = {Maier, M. W. and Erhard, S. and Niklasch, M. and Bruckner, T. and Wolf, S. I. and Zeifang, F. and Raiss, P.},
    month = apr,
    year = {2017},
    keywords = {Biomechanical model, Constant score, Internal rotation, Iro, Marker-based system, Upper extremity, Validity},
    annote = {1434-3916Maier, Michael WErhard, SarahNiklasch, MirjamBruckner, ThomasWolf, Sebastian IZeifang, FelixRaiss, PatricJournal ArticleGermanyArch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2017 Apr 4. doi: 10.1007/s00402-017-2656-4.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118, Heidelberg, Germany. Institute for Medical Biometry and Informatics, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118, Heidelberg, Germany. patric.raiss@ocm-muenchen.de. OCM (Orthopadische Chirurgie Munchen) Clinic, Munich, Germany. patric.raiss@ocm-muenchen.de.alt-title: Archives of orthopaedic and trauma surgeryedition: 2017/04/06accession-num: 28378210remote-database-provider: NLM}
    }
  • [DOI] P. P. Pott, S. I. Wolf, J. Block, S. van Drongelen, M. Grun, D. W. Heitzmann, J. Hielscher, A. Horn, R. Muller, O. Rettig, U. Konigorski, R. Werthschutzky, H. F. Schlaak, and T. Meiss: „Knee-ankle-foot orthosis with powered knee for support in the elderly,“ Proc inst mech eng h, p. 954411917704008, 2017.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{pott_knee-ankle-foot_2017,
    title = {Knee-ankle-foot orthosis with powered knee for support in the elderly},
    issn = {0954-4119},
    doi = {10.1177/0954411917704008},
    abstract = {A prototype of a powered knee orthotic device was developed to determine whether fractional external torque and power support to the knee relieves the biomechanical loads and reduces the muscular demand for a subject performing sit-to-stand movements. With this demonstrator, consisting of the subsystems actuation, kinematics, sensors, and control, all relevant sensor data can be acquired and full control is maintained over actuator parameters. A series-elastic actuator based on a direct current motor provides up to 30 Nm torque to the knee via a hinge joint with an additional sliding degree of freedom. For reasons of feasibility under everyday conditions, user intention is monitored by employing a noninvasive, nonsticking muscle activity sensor to replace electromyographic sensors, which require skin preparation. Furthermore, foot plates with force sensors have been developed and included to derive ground reaction forces. The actual knee torque needed to provide the desired support is based on an inverse dynamics model using ground reaction forces signals and leg kinematics. A control algorithm including disturbance feed forward has been implemented. A demonstration experiment with two subjects showed that 23 \% of moment support in fact leads to a similar reduction in activation of the main knee extensor muscle.},
    language = {eng},
    journal = {Proc Inst Mech Eng H},
    author = {Pott, P. P. and Wolf, S. I. and Block, J. and van Drongelen, S. and Grun, M. and Heitzmann, D. W. and Hielscher, J. and Horn, A. and Muller, R. and Rettig, O. and Konigorski, U. and Werthschutzky, R. and Schlaak, H. F. and Meiss, T.},
    month = may,
    year = {2017},
    keywords = {active support, actuators, control, experimental evaluation, muscle activity, Orthotics, sensors/sensor applications},
    pages = {954411917704008},
    annote = {2041-3033Pott, Peter PaulWolf, Sebastian ImmanuelBlock, Juliavan Drongelen, StefanGrun, MarkusHeitzmann, Daniel WwHielscher, JurgenHorn, AndreasMuller, RomanRettig, OliverKonigorski, UlrichWerthschutzky, RolandSchlaak, Helmut FriedrichMeiss, ThorstenJournal ArticleEnglandProc Inst Mech Eng H. 2017 May 1:954411917704008. doi: 10.1177/0954411917704008.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: 1 Laboratory Microtechnology and Electromechanical Systems, Institute of Electromechanical Design, Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany. 2 Laboratory Measurement and Sensor Technology, Institute of Electromechanical Design, Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany. 3 Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. 4 Movement Analysis Lab, Orthopaedic University Hospital Friedrichsheim gGmbH, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 5 Control Systems and Mechatronics Lab, Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany. 6 Zuhlke Engineering GmbH, Eschborn, Germany. 7 EvoSense Research \& Development GmbH, Darmstadt, Germany.alt-title: Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Part H, Journal of engineering in medicineedition: 2017/05/04accession-num: 28466759remote-database-provider: NLM}
    }
  • [DOI] C. Putz, J. Block, S. Gantz, D. W. Heitzmann, T. Dreher, B. Lehner, M. Alimusaj, S. I. Wolf, and S. Muller: „Structural changes in the thigh muscles following trans-femoral amputation,“ Eur j orthop surg traumatol, 2017.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{putz_structural_2017,
    title = {Structural changes in the thigh muscles following trans-femoral amputation},
    issn = {1633-8065 (Print) 1633-8065},
    doi = {10.1007/s00590-017-1929-5},
    abstract = {INTRODUCTION: Early ambulation is the principal objective in trans-femoral amputees. Postamputation modifications complicate the rehabilitation process due to a reduced control at the interface between stump and prosthesis. The aim of this study is to determine whether magnetic resonance imaging depicts the amount of fatty degeneration of the thigh muscles after trans-femoral amputation (TFA). METHODS: A total of 12 patients following a TFA on the basis of a bone neoplasm or metastasis with an evaluable postoperative MRI were identified. Using the Goutallier classification, the fatty degeneration of the thigh muscles was analyzed in the middle (M) and at the distal end (E) of the residual limb at T1 (10.6 months) and T2 (25.6 months). RESULTS: Analysis at two different levels showed different grades of fatty degeneration of thigh muscles after TFA at T1 and T2. Comparing fatty degeneration at both levels of the stump, the quadriceps femoris revealed a significant change (p = 0.01) at T1 and M. sartorius and adductor (p = 0.02) at T2. CONCLUSIONS: MRI is an excellent diagnostic tool to evaluate fatty degeneration after TFA. The highest amount of fatty degeneration of the quadriceps muscle was monitored within the first 10 months. Early physiotherapy is important to strengthen the remaining stump muscles during rehabilitation.},
    language = {eng},
    journal = {Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol},
    author = {Putz, C. and Block, J. and Gantz, S. and Heitzmann, D. W. and Dreher, T. and Lehner, B. and Alimusaj, M. and Wolf, S. I. and Muller, S.},
    month = feb,
    year = {2017},
    keywords = {Goutallier classification, intramuscular fatty degeneration, Magnetic resonance imaging, Thigh muscles, Trans-femoral amputation},
    annote = {Putz, CBlock, JGantz, SHeitzmann, D W WDreher, TLehner, BAlimusaj, MWolf, S IMuller, SJournal ArticleFranceEur J Orthop Surg Traumatol. 2017 Feb 21. doi: 10.1007/s00590-017-1929-5.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Paediatric Orthopaedics and Foot Surgery, Center for Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118, Heidelberg, Germany. cornelia.putz@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Paediatric Orthopaedics and Foot Surgery, Center for Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118, Heidelberg, Germany. Experimental Orthopaedics, Center for Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118, Heidelberg, Germany. Tumour Orthopaedics, Center for Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118, Heidelberg, Germany.alt-title: European journal of orthopaedic surgery \& traumatology : orthopedie traumatologieedition: 2017/02/23accession-num: 28224229remote-database-provider: NLM}
    }
  • [DOI] M. Sreenivasa, M. Millard, M. Felis, K. Mombaur, and S. I. Wolf: „Optimal Control Based Stiffness Identification of an Ankle-Foot Orthosis Using a Predictive Walking Model,“ Front comput neurosci, vol. 11, p. 23, 2017.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{sreenivasa_optimal_2017,
    title = {Optimal {Control} {Based} {Stiffness} {Identification} of an {Ankle}-{Foot} {Orthosis} {Using} a {Predictive} {Walking} {Model}},
    volume = {11},
    issn = {1662-5188},
    doi = {10.3389/fncom.2017.00023},
    abstract = {Predicting the movements, ground reaction forces and neuromuscular activity during gait can be a valuable asset to the clinical rehabilitation community, both to understand pathology, as well as to plan effective intervention. In this work we use an optimal control method to generate predictive simulations of pathological gait in the sagittal plane. We construct a patient-specific model corresponding to a 7-year old child with gait abnormalities and identify the optimal spring characteristics of an ankle-foot orthosis that minimizes muscle effort. Our simulations include the computation of foot-ground reaction forces, as well as the neuromuscular dynamics using computationally efficient muscle torque generators and excitation-activation equations. The optimal control problem (OCP) is solved with a direct multiple shooting method. The solution of this problem is physically consistent synthetic neural excitation commands, muscle activations and whole body motion. Our simulations produced similar changes to the gait characteristics as those recorded on the patient. The orthosis-equipped model was able to walk faster with more extended knees. Notably, our approach can be easily tuned to simulate weakened muscles, produces physiologically realistic ground reaction forces and smooth muscle activations and torques, and can be implemented on a standard workstation to produce results within a few hours. These results are an important contribution toward bridging the gap between research methods in computational neuromechanics and day-to-day clinical rehabilitation.},
    language = {eng},
    journal = {Front Comput Neurosci},
    author = {Sreenivasa, M. and Millard, M. and Felis, M. and Mombaur, K. and Wolf, S. I.},
    year = {2017},
    pmcid = {Pmc5390028},
    keywords = {model-based optimization, movement prediction, neuromechanics, parameter identification, pathological gait},
    pages = {23},
    annote = {Sreenivasa, ManishMillard, MatthewFelis, MartinMombaur, KatjaWolf, Sebastian IJournal ArticleSwitzerlandFront Comput Neurosci. 2017 Apr 13;11:23. doi: 10.3389/fncom.2017.00023. eCollection 2017.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Optimization in Robotics and Biomechanics, Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, Heidelberg UniversityHeidelberg, Germany. Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University HospitalHeidelberg, Germany.alt-title: Frontiers in computational neuroscienceedition: 2017/04/30accession-num: 28450833remote-database-provider: NLM}
    }

2016

  • [DOI] E. Kalkum, S. van Drongelen, J. Mussler, S. I. Wolf, and B. Kuni: „A marker placement laser device for improving repeatability in 3d-foot motion analysis,“ Gait posture, vol. 44, pp. 227-30, 2016.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{kalkum_marker_2016,
    title = {A marker placement laser device for improving repeatability in 3D-foot motion analysis},
    volume = {44},
    issn = {0966-6362},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2015.12.024},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: In 3D gait analysis, the repeated positioning of markers is associated with a high error rate, particularly when using a complex foot model with many markers. Therefore, a marker placement laser device was developed that ensures a reliable repositioning of markers. We report the development and reliability of this device for the foot at different tape conditions. METHODS: In 38 subjects, markers were placed at the foot according to the Heidelberg foot measurement method. Subjects were tested barefoot and barefoot with three different tape conditions. For all conditions, a static standing trial was captured. We analyzed differences in distances between markers and the intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). RESULTS: Small differences between the conditions (0.03-3.28 mm) and excellent ICCs (0.91-0.97 mm) were found for all parameters. CONCLUSION: The laser marker placement device appeared to be a reliable method to place markers on a tape at previously palpated positions and ensures an exact position. The device could find a wide application in different clinical research fields.},
    language = {eng},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Kalkum, E. and van Drongelen, S. and Mussler, J. and Wolf, S. I. and Kuni, B.},
    month = feb,
    year = {2016},
    keywords = {*Fiducial Markers, *Lasers, Ankle Injuries/prevention \& control, Athletic Tape, Biomechanical Phenomena, Female, Foot model, Foot/*physiology, Gait/*physiology, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional/*instrumentation/methods, Laser device, Male, Marker replacement error, Repeatability, Reproducibility of Results, Tape},
    pages = {227--30},
    annote = {1879-2219Kalkum, Evavan Drongelen, StefanMussler, JohannesWolf, Sebastian IKuni, BenitaJournal ArticleRandomized Controlled TrialResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEnglandGait Posture. 2016 Feb;44:227-30. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2015.12.024. Epub 2015 Dec 21.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Center for Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Center for Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: benita@kuni.org.alt-title: Gait \& postureedition: 2016/03/24accession-num: 27004663remote-database-provider: NLM}
    }
  • [DOI] M. C. Klotz, D. W. Heitzmann, S. I. Wolf, M. Niklasch, M. W. Maier, and T. Dreher: „The influence of timing of knee recurvatum on surgical outcome in cerebral palsy,“ Res dev disabil, vol. 48, pp. 186-92, 2016.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{klotz_influence_2016,
    title = {The influence of timing of knee recurvatum on surgical outcome in cerebral palsy},
    volume = {48},
    issn = {0891-4222},
    doi = {10.1016/j.ridd.2015.09.017},
    abstract = {Recent reports have shown that timing of genu recurvatum (GR) might be caused by different underlying factors and that equinus leads to GR especially during early stance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reduction of GR after surgical correction of equinus in children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy and whether the children with early and late type GR show differences in reduction of knee hyperextension after a surgery. In 24 limbs (mean age 10.3 years, GMFCS I-III) showing equinus and GR the kinematics of the knee and ankle as well as the kinetics of the knee were evaluated before and one year (mean follow up period: 12.8 months) after surgical correction of equinus. The study was approved by the local ethical committee. Limbs with early type GR showed a reduction by 11.1 degrees (p{\textless}0.001) and those with late type GR by 6.0 degrees (p{\textless}0.049) in GR after surgery. Before surgery limbs with early type GR showed increased external extending moments, which decreased significantly after surgery. In contrast limbs with late GR did not show a significant reduction of those moments. The findings of this study underline the influence of equinus on early GR as an underlying factor. As equinus is attributed to early knee hyperextension and proximal factors are more important as underlying factors in late type GR, a classification into early and late onset GR is useful to identify underlying factors and to choose adequate treatment.},
    language = {eng},
    journal = {Res Dev Disabil},
    author = {Klotz, M. C. and Heitzmann, D. W. and Wolf, S. I. and Niklasch, M. and Maier, M. W. and Dreher, T.},
    month = jan,
    year = {2016},
    keywords = {*Cerebral Palsy/complications/physiopathology, *Foot Deformities/epidemiology/etiology/physiopathology/surgery, *Knee Joint/pathology/physiopathology, Age of Onset, Biomechanical Phenomena, Cerebral palsy, Child, Children, Equinus, Female, Gait, Genu recurvatum, Humans, Knee, Male, Motion analysis, Orthopedic Procedures/methods, Postoperative Period, Range of Motion, Articular/physiology, Time Factors, Timing},
    pages = {186--92},
    annote = {1873-3379Klotz, Matthias C MHeitzmann, Daniel W WWolf, Sebastian INiklasch, MirjamMaier, Michael WDreher, ThomasJournal ArticleUnited StatesRes Dev Disabil. 2016 Jan;48:186-92. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2015.09.017. Epub 2015 Nov 19.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: matthias.klotz@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Department of Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: daniel.heitzmann@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Department of Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: Sebastian.wolf@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Department of Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: mirjam.niklasch@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Department of Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: michael.maier@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Department of Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: thomas.dreher@med.uni-heidelberg.de.alt-title: Research in developmental disabilitiesedition: 2015/11/26accession-num: 26599296remote-database-provider: NLM}
    }
  • [DOI] B. K. Krautwurst, T. Dreher, and S. I. Wolf: „The impact of walking devices on kinematics in patients with spastic bilateral cerebral palsy,“ Gait posture, vol. 46, pp. 184-7, 2016.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{krautwurst_impact_2016,
    title = {The impact of walking devices on kinematics in patients with spastic bilateral cerebral palsy},
    volume = {46},
    issn = {0966-6362},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.03.014},
    abstract = {Increased anterior pelvic and trunk tilt is a common finding in patients with bilateral cerebral palsy especially during walking with assistive devices. As previous studies demonstrate various gait alterations when using assistive devices, the assessment of surgical interventions may be biased when the patients become independent of (or dependent on) assistive devices after therapy. Furthermore, some of these patients in fact are able to walk without devices even though in daily life they prefer to use them. Consequently, for such patients the classification into GMFCS level II or III may be ambiguous. The specific aim of this study was therefore to assess the influence of the use of forearm crutches and posterior walker during walking and to set this influence in relation to outcome effects of surgical intervention studies. 26 ambulatory patients with spastic bilateral CP (GMFCS II-III) were included who underwent 3D gait analysis. All patients used forearm crutches or posterior walkers in everyday life even though they were able to walk without assistive devices for short distances. Independent of the type of assistive devices, the patients walk on average with more anterior trunk tilt and pelvic tilt (7 degrees +/-6 degrees and 3 degrees +/-2 degrees ) and with a maximum ankle dorsiflexion decreased by 2 degrees (+/-3 degrees ) when walking with assistive devices, enhancing the mal-positioning present without device. Oppositely, the knees on average are more extended by 6 degrees (+/-4 degrees ) when using the assistive devices. These effects have to be taken into account when assessing gait patterns or when monitoring the outcome after intervention as assistive devices may partially hide or exaggerate therapeutic effects.},
    language = {eng},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Krautwurst, B. K. and Dreher, T. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = may,
    year = {2016},
    keywords = {*Crutches, *Walkers, Adolescent, Biomechanical Phenomena, Cerebral palsy, Cerebral Palsy/*physiopathology/therapy, Child, Crutches, Female, Gait analysis, Gait/*physiology, Humans, Kinematics, Male, Muscle Spasticity/*physiopathology/therapy, Physical Therapy Modalities, Posterior walker, Retrospective Studies, Walking/*physiology, Young Adult},
    pages = {184--7},
    annote = {1879-2219Krautwurst, Britta KDreher, ThomasWolf, Sebastian IJournal ArticleEnglandGait Posture. 2016 May;46:184-7. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.03.014. Epub 2016 Mar 26.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Heidelberg University Clinics, Department for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 66118 Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: britta.krautwurst@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Heidelberg University Clinics, Department for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 66118 Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: thomas.dreher@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Heidelberg University Clinics, Department for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 66118 Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: sebastian.wolf@med.uni-heidelberg.de.alt-title: Gait \& postureedition: 2016/05/01accession-num: 27131199remote-database-provider: NLM}
    }
  • [DOI] B. K. Krautwurst, S. I. Wolf, and T. Dreher: „Three-dimensional evaluation of heel raise test in pediatric planovalgus feet and normal feet,“ Gait posture, vol. 48, pp. 146-51, 2016.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{krautwurst_three-dimensional_2016,
    title = {Three-dimensional evaluation of heel raise test in pediatric planovalgus feet and normal feet},
    volume = {48},
    issn = {0966-6362},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.05.003},
    abstract = {Planovalgus foot is a common pediatric deformity which may be associated with pain. To evaluate flexibility of the foot, the heel raise test is used. During this test the arch and hindfoot are assessed. Several studies have described planovalgus foot based on 3D gait and standing analysis. However, no studies have evaluated foot flexibility during heel raise using an objective 3D analysis. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the flexibility of planovalgus feet during the heel raise test using an objective 3D assessment and to determine whether any hypotheses can be generated about potential differences between painful and painless flexible planovalgus feet and reference feet. Here, 3D foot analysis was conducted in 33 children (7 reference feet, 16 painless, and 10 painful flexible planovalgus feet) during the heel raise test. To identify the characteristics of planovalgus foot, the concept of 3D projection angles was used as introduced in the Heidelberg Foot Measurement Method (HFMM), with a modified marker set. All feet showed dynamic movements of the medial arch and hindfoot from valgus to varus position during heel raise. Reference feet had the smallest range of motion, perhaps due to joint stability and absence of foot deformity. Painful and painless flexible planovalgus feet demonstrated similar movements. No significant differences were found between the painful and painless groups. However, the kinematics of the pain group seemed to differ more from those of the reference group than did kinematics of the painless group. This assessment is a new, practical, and objective method to measure the flexibility of small children's feet.},
    language = {eng},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Krautwurst, B. K. and Wolf, S. I. and Dreher, T.},
    month = jul,
    year = {2016},
    keywords = {Flexibility, Heel raise test, Pediatric planovalgus foot, Three-dimensional foot analysis},
    pages = {146--51},
    annote = {1879-2219Krautwurst, Britta KWolf, Sebastian IDreher, ThomasJournal ArticleEnglandGait Posture. 2016 Jul;48:146-51. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.05.003. Epub 2016 May 10.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Heidelberg University Clinics, Department for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, D-66118 Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: britta.krautwurst@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Heidelberg University Clinics, Department for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, D-66118 Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: sebastian.wolf@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Heidelberg University Clinics, Department for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, D-66118 Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: thomas.dreher@med.uni-heidelberg.de.alt-title: Gait \& postureedition: 2016/06/06accession-num: 27262407remote-database-provider: NLM}
    }
  • [DOI] B. Kuni, J. Mussler, E. Kalkum, H. Schmitt, and S. I. Wolf: „Effect of kinesiotaping, non-elastic taping and bracing on segmental foot kinematics during drop landing in healthy subjects and subjects with chronic ankle instability,“ Physiotherapy, vol. 102, pp. 287-93, 2016.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{kuni_effect_2016,
    title = {Effect of kinesiotaping, non-elastic taping and bracing on segmental foot kinematics during drop landing in healthy subjects and subjects with chronic ankle instability},
    volume = {102},
    issn = {0031-9406},
    doi = {10.1016/j.physio.2015.07.004},
    abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of kinesiotape, non-elastic tape, and soft brace on segmental foot kinematics during drop landing in subjects with chronic ankle instability and healthy subjects. DESIGN: Controlled study with repeated measurements. SETTING: Three-dimensional motion analysis laboratory. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty participants with chronic ankle instability and 20 healthy subjects. INTERVENTIONS: The subjects performed drop landings with 17 retroreflective markers on the foot and lower leg in four conditions: barefoot, with kinesiotape, with non-elastic tape and with a soft brace. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Ranges of motion of foot segments using a foot measurement method. RESULTS: In participants with chronic ankle instability, midfoot movement in the frontal plane (inclination of the medial arch) was reduced significantly by non-elastic taping, but kinesiotaping and bracing had no effect. In healthy subjects, both non-elastic taping and bracing reduced that movement. In both groups, non-elastic taping and bracing reduced rearfoot excursion in inversion/eversion significantly, which indicates a stabilisation effect. No such effect was found with kinesiotaping. All three methods reduced maximum plantar flexion significantly. CONCLUSIONS: Non-elastic taping stabilised the midfoot best in patients with chronic ankle instability, while kinesiotaping did not influence foot kinematics other than to stabilise the rearfoot in the sagittal plane. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01810471.},
    language = {eng},
    journal = {Physiotherapy},
    author = {Kuni, B. and Mussler, J. and Kalkum, E. and Schmitt, H. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = sep,
    year = {2016},
    keywords = {*Athletic Tape, Adult, Ankle Joint/*physiopathology, Biomechanical Phenomena, Case-Control Studies, Chronic ankle instability, Chronic Disease, Female, Foot kinematics, Foot/*physiopathology, Humans, Joint Instability/*physiopathology, Jump landing, Kinesiotape, Male, Range of Motion, Articular, Risk Factors, Soft brace, Tape},
    pages = {287--93},
    annote = {1873-1465Kuni, BMussler, JKalkum, ESchmitt, HWolf, S IJournal ArticleEnglandPhysiotherapy. 2016 Sep;102(3):287-93. doi: 10.1016/j.physio.2015.07.004. Epub 2015 Sep 3.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Clinic for Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, Centre for Orthopaedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: benita@kuni.org. Clinic for Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, Centre for Orthopaedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany.alt-title: Physiotherapynumber: 3edition: 2015/10/01accession-num: 26422550remote-database-provider: NLM}
    }
  • [DOI] B. J. Misgeld, M. Luken, D. Heitzmann, S. I. Wolf, and S. Leonhardt: „Body-Sensor-Network-Based Spasticity Detection,“ Ieee j biomed health inform, vol. 20, pp. 748-755, 2016.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{misgeld_body-sensor-network-based_2016,
    title = {Body-{Sensor}-{Network}-{Based} {Spasticity} {Detection}},
    volume = {20},
    issn = {2168-2194},
    doi = {10.1109/jbhi.2015.2477245},
    abstract = {Spasticity is a common disorder of the skeletal muscle with a high incidence in industrialised countries. A quantitative measure of spasticity using body-worn sensors is important in order to assess rehabilitative motor training and to adjust the rehabilitative therapy accordingly. We present a new approach to spasticity detection using the Integrated Posture and Activity Network by Medit Aachen body sensor network (BSN). For this, a new electromyography (EMG) sensor node was developed and employed in human locomotion. Following an analysis of the clinical gait data of patients with unilateral cerebral palsy, a novel algorithm was developed based on the idea to detect coactivation of antagonistic muscle groups as observed in the exaggerated stretch reflex with associated joint rigidity. The algorithm applies a cross-correlation function to the EMG signals of two antagonistically working muscles and subsequent weighting using a Blackman window. The result is a coactivation index which is also weighted by the signal equivalent energy to exclude positive detection of inactive muscles. Our experimental study indicates good performance in the detection of coactive muscles associated with spasticity from clinical data as well as measurements from a BSN in qualitative comparison with the Modified Ashworth Scale as classified by clinical experts. Possible applications of the new algorithm include (but are not limited to) use in robotic sensorimotor therapy to reduce the effect of spasticity.},
    language = {eng},
    journal = {IEEE J Biomed Health Inform},
    author = {Misgeld, B. J. and Luken, M. and Heitzmann, D. and Wolf, S. I. and Leonhardt, S.},
    month = may,
    year = {2016},
    pages = {748--755},
    annote = {2168-2208Misgeld, Berno J ELuken, MarkusHeitzmann, DanielWolf, Sebastian ILeonhardt, SteffenJournal ArticleUnited StatesIEEE J Biomed Health Inform. 2016 May;20(3):748-755. doi: 10.1109/JBHI.2015.2477245. Epub 2015 Sep 8.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:alt-title: IEEE journal of biomedical and health informaticsnumber: 3edition: 2015/09/12accession-num: 26357413remote-database-provider: NLM}
    }
  • [DOI] C. Putz, L. Doderlein, E. M. Mertens, S. I. Wolf, S. Gantz, F. Braatz, and T. Dreher: „Multilevel surgery in adults with cerebral palsy,“ Bone joint j, vol. 98-b, pp. 282-8, 2016.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{putz_multilevel_2016,
    title = {Multilevel surgery in adults with cerebral palsy},
    volume = {98-b},
    issn = {2049-4394},
    doi = {10.1302/0301-620x.98b2.36122},
    abstract = {AIMS: Single-event multilevel surgery (SEMLS) has been used as an effective intervention in children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy (BSCP) for 30 years. To date there is no evidence for SEMLS in adults with BSCP and the intervention remains focus of debate. METHODS: This study analysed the short-term outcome (mean 1.7 years, standard deviation 0.9) of 97 ambulatory adults with BSCP who performed three-dimensional gait analysis before and after SEMLS at one institution. RESULTS: Two objective gait variables were calculated pre- and post-operatively; the Gillette Gait Index (GGI) and the Gait Profile Score (GPS). The results were analysed in three groups according to their childhood surgical history (group 1 = no surgery, group 2 = surgery other than SEMLS, group 3 = SEMLS). Improvements in gait were shown by a significant decrease of GPS (p = 0.001). Similar results were obtained for both legs (GGI right side and left side p = 0.01). Furthermore, significant improvements were found in all subgroups although this was less marked in group 3, where patients had undergone previous SEMLS. DISCUSSION: SEMLS is an effective and safe procedure to improve gait in adults with cerebral palsy. However, a longer rehabilitation period is to be expected than found in children. SEMLS is still effective in adult patients who have undergone previous SEMLS in childhood. TAKE HOME MESSAGE: Single-event multilevel surgery is a safe and effective procedure to improve gait disorders in adults with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy.},
    language = {eng},
    journal = {Bone Joint J},
    author = {Putz, C. and Doderlein, L. and Mertens, E. M. and Wolf, S. I. and Gantz, S. and Braatz, F. and Dreher, T.},
    month = feb,
    year = {2016},
    keywords = {Adolescent, Adult, adults, Aged, Case-Control Studies, Cerebral palsy, Cerebral Palsy/rehabilitation/*surgery, Female, Gait, Gait analysis, Gait Disorders, Neurologic/rehabilitation/*surgery, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, multilevel surgery, Neurologic Examination, Outcome, Postoperative Complications/etiology, Weight-Bearing/physiology, Young Adult},
    pages = {282--8},
    annote = {2049-4408Putz, CDoderlein, LMertens, E MWolf, S IGantz, SBraatz, FDreher, TJournal ArticleEnglandBone Joint J. 2016 Feb;98-B(2):282-8. doi: 10.1302/0301-620X.98B2.36122.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. Orthopaedic Hospital for Children, Behandlungszentrum Aschau GmbH, Bernauerstrasse 18, 83229 Aschau i. Chiemgau, Germany. Private University of Applied Sciences Gottingen, Robert Koch Strasse 40, 37075 Gottingen, Germany.alt-title: The bone \& joint journalnumber: 2edition: 2016/02/07accession-num: 26850437remote-database-provider: NLM}
    }
  • [DOI] C. Putz, S. I. Wolf, A. Geisbusch, M. Niklasch, L. Doderlein, and T. Dreher: „Femoral derotation osteotomy in adults with cerebral palsy,“ Gait posture, vol. 49, pp. 290-6, 2016.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{putz_femoral_2016,
    title = {Femoral derotation osteotomy in adults with cerebral palsy},
    volume = {49},
    issn = {0966-6362},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.06.034},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: Internal rotation gait constitutes a complex gait disorder in bilateral spastic cerebral palsy (BSCP) including static torsional and dynamic components resulting in lever arm dysfunction. Although femoral derotation osteotomy (FDO) is a standard procedure to correct increased femoral anteversion in children, unpredictable outcome has been reported. The effect of FDO when it is done as part of single-event multilevel surgery (SEMLS) in adulthood has not been investigated. METHODS: In this study mid-term data of 63 adults with BSCP and internal rotation gait, undergoing SEMLS including FDO were analyzed pre- and 1.7 years postoperatively by clinical examination and 3D-instrumented gait analysis. All legs were categorized as the more or less involved side to consider asymmetry. The mean hip rotation in stance preoperatively and the intraoperative derotation was correlated with the difference pre- and postoperatively. RESULTS: The group as a whole experienced the following results postoperatively: improved mean hip rotation in stance (p=0.0001), mean foot progression angle (p=0.0001) and a significant improvement of the clinical parameter: passive internal and external hip rotation, midpoint and anteversion (p=0.0001) for both legs separately. With regard to the less and more involved side, clinical and kinematic parameters showed comparable significant changes (p=0.0001). The anteversion improved significantly in proximal compared to distal FDO (p=0.03). CONCLUSION: This study emphasizes an overall good correction of internal rotation gait in adults with bilateral involvement after FDO. However, the results are more predictable in adults compared to studies reporting outcome after FDO in children.},
    language = {eng},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Putz, C. and Wolf, S. I. and Geisbusch, A. and Niklasch, M. and Doderlein, L. and Dreher, T.},
    month = sep,
    year = {2016},
    keywords = {adults, Cerebral palsy, Femoral derotation osteotomy, Gait analysis, Internal rotation gait},
    pages = {290--6},
    annote = {1879-2219Putz, CWolf, S IGeisbusch, ANiklasch, MDoderlein, LDreher, TJournal ArticleEnglandGait Posture. 2016 Sep;49:290-6. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.06.034. Epub 2016 Jun 27.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Pediatric Orthopedics and Foot Surgery, Center for Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. Orthopedic Hospital for Children, Behandlungszentrum Aschau GmbH, Bernauerstrasse 18, 83229 Aschau i. Chiemgau, Germany. Pediatric Orthopedics and Foot Surgery, Center for Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: thomas.dreher@med.uni-heidelberg.de.alt-title: Gait \& postureedition: 2016/08/01accession-num: 27475618remote-database-provider: NLM}
    }
  • [DOI] M. Sreenivasa, C. J. Chamorro, D. Gonzalez-Alvarado, O. Rettig, and S. I. Wolf: „Patient-specific bone geometry and segment inertia from MRI images for model-based analysis of pathological gait,“ J biomech, vol. 49, pp. 1918-25, 2016.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{sreenivasa_patient-specific_2016,
    title = {Patient-specific bone geometry and segment inertia from {MRI} images for model-based analysis of pathological gait},
    volume = {49},
    issn = {0021-9290},
    doi = {10.1016/j.jbiomech.2016.05.001},
    abstract = {Patient-specific modeling is a vital component in the translation of computational multibody dynamics into clinical practice. Recent research has focused on ways to derive such models from medical imaging, but the process is usually time consuming and sensitive to operator skill. Here, we present methods to derive kinematic and inertial properties of body segments from MRI images, and condense them into a dynamically consistent patient-specific multibody model (PSM). We develop a semi-automated tool chain to classify bone, muscle and fat in the lower body and use optimization and geometrical methods to derive personalized bone meshes and segment inertial properties. The tool chain is applied to investigate the gait of a 12-yr old female with bone deformities. The patient-specific results are compared to those arising from generic scaled models with parameters based on regression equations. We found several kinematic and inertial differences between the two models, and overall the PSM resulted in markedly smaller angular and force residuals. The PSM was able to capture vital aspects of this patients gait in the transverse plane that were overlooked by the generic model. These results are relevant to the use of multibody dynamics in the planning of surgical interventions, and form the basis for developing efficient and automatic methods to create patient-specific models.},
    language = {eng},
    journal = {J Biomech},
    author = {Sreenivasa, M. and Chamorro, C. J. and Gonzalez-Alvarado, D. and Rettig, O. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = jun,
    year = {2016},
    keywords = {Bone morphing, MRI segmentation, Pathological gait dynamics, Patient-specific modeling},
    pages = {1918--25},
    annote = {1873-2380Sreenivasa, ManishChamorro, Carlos Javier GonzalezGonzalez-Alvarado, DanielRettig, OliverWolf, Sebastian IJournal ArticleUnited StatesJ Biomech. 2016 Jun 14;49(9):1918-25. doi: 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2016.05.001. Epub 2016 May 7.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Optimization in Robotics \& Biomechanics, Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, University of Heidelberg, Berlinerstr. 45, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. Electronic address: manish.sreenivasa@iwr.uni-heidelberg.de. Optimization in Robotics \& Biomechanics, Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, University of Heidelberg, Berlinerstr. 45, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany.alt-title: Journal of biomechanicsnumber: 9edition: 2016/05/23accession-num: 27209551remote-database-provider: NLM}
    }

2015

  • [DOI] N. A. Beckmann, S. I. Wolf, D. Heitzmann, A. Wallroth, S. Muller, and T. Dreher: „Cavovarus deformity in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: is there a hindfoot equinus deformity that needs treatment?,“ J foot ankle res, vol. 8, p. 65, 2015.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{beckmann_cavovarus_2015,
    title = {Cavovarus deformity in {Charcot}-{Marie}-{Tooth} disease: is there a hindfoot equinus deformity that needs treatment?},
    volume = {8},
    issn = {1757-1146},
    doi = {10.1186/s13047-015-0121-6},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), one of the most common hereditary neurologic disorders, often results in debilitating cavovarus foot deformities. The deformities are still not fully understood, and the treatment recommendations are consequently heterogeneous, often including calf muscle or Achilles tendon lengthening. METHODS: We examined 40 patients (80 feet) with CMT and bilateral cavovarus deformities (19 men and 21 women, mean age 33.6 +/- 14.6 years) and the feet of a healthy control population of 13 individuals (7 men and 6 women, mean age 43.9 +/- 10.8 years). In all cases 3D instrumented gait analysis results with both conventional Plug-in-Gait analysis and the Heidelberg Foot Measurement Method (HFMM) were used to determine the sagittal plane kinematics, dorsi-plantar flexion (DPF), tibio-talar dorsiflexion (TTDF), and medial arch angle (MAA), and the results of patients and the control group were compared using the 2 methods. Decreased and increased dorsiflexion using TTDF was defined as 1 standard deviation below or above the mean of the control. Comparisons were done using descriptive statistics, the Pearson correlation coefficient and ANOVA. RESULTS: The TTDF was found to be decreased in 18 of the 80 feet examined (22.5 \%), normal in 31 feet (38.75 \%), and increased in 31 feet (38.75 \%). The Pearson coefficient showed a positive correlation with R = 0.765, p {\textless} 0.001 between decreased TTDF values found by HFMM and decreased DPF values found with conventional Plug-in-Gait analysis, but a very weak correlation in patients with normal TTDF (R = -0.118) and increased TTDF (R = 0.078). Also, in patients with decreased TTDF values, there was a weak to moderate correlation with the MAA (R = 0.335), but no correlation between the MAA and DPF (R = 0.023). CONCLUSIONS: The HFMM, unlike the conventional Plug-in-Gait analysis, distinguishes between the segments of the foot in foot deformities and facilitates evaluation of the hindfoot equinus component in patients with CMT and cavovarus deformity. Although there is a significant correlation between decreased TTDF with HFMM and decreased DPF with conventional Plug-in-Gait analysis, this correlation was not seen in patients with normal or increased TTDF values. Conventional Plug-in-Gait analysis alone does not indicate if an increased plantar flexion deformity is the result of either a cavus deformity or hindfoot equinus deformity, which limits its usefulness in assisting in treatment decision making.},
    language = {eng},
    journal = {J Foot Ankle Res},
    author = {Beckmann, N. A. and Wolf, S. I. and Heitzmann, D. and Wallroth, A. and Muller, S. and Dreher, T.},
    year = {2015},
    pmcid = {Pmc4661993},
    pages = {65},
    annote = {Beckmann, Nicholas AWolf, Sebastian IHeitzmann, DanielWallroth, AnnikaMuller, SebastianDreher, ThomasJournal ArticleEnglandJ Foot Ankle Res. 2015 Nov 26;8:65. doi: 10.1186/s13047-015-0121-6. eCollection 2015.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Clinic for Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200A, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. Heidelberg Motion Lab, Clinic for Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200A, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany.alt-title: Journal of foot and ankle researchedition: 2015/12/01accession-num: 26617675remote-database-provider: NLM}
    }
  • [DOI] F. Braatz, J. Poljuchow, M. C. Klotz, D. W. Heitzmann, S. I. Wolf, and T. Dreher: „Femoral Derotation in Children with Cerebral Palsy – Does the Result Depend on the Age at Operation and the Kind of Surgery?,“ Z orthop unfall, vol. 153, pp. 636-42, 2015.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{braatz_femoral_2015,
    title = {Femoral {Derotation} in {Children} with {Cerebral} {Palsy} - {Does} the {Result} {Depend} on the {Age} at {Operation} and the {Kind} of {Surgery}?},
    volume = {153},
    issn = {1864-6697},
    doi = {10.1055/s-0035-1557934},
    abstract = {INTRODUCTION: Patients with spastic cerebral palsy GMFCS I-III often develop gait dysfunctions. One of the most prevalent gait dysfunctions is the intoeing gait. Femoral derotation osteotomy is the common treatment for internal rotation gait in cerebral palsy. We now present 3D-gait analysis data of the hip rotation in gait before and after femoral derotation osteotomy. We analysed the influence of the age at the index operation on the risk of recurrence and the surgical technique. METHODS: We included 48 patients treated with femoral derotation osteotomy during a single event of multi-level surgery. Mean hip rotation in standing was measured before and after femoral derotation osteotomy (FDO). The patients were divided into two groups of different age and in a second analysis into two groups with the osteotomy in different locations, either inter-trochanteric (DO proximal) or supracondylar (DO distal). RESULTS: Age at FDO and surgical technique had no influence on the results. However, the variance of the results was very high. Differences were found in the walking speed between the DO proximal and DO distal groups. The walking speed in the group of distal femoral osteotomy was higher. This difference was not significant, but there was a trend to proximal osteotomy in slower walkers. Significant improvements in IRG after FDO were found in our investigation. Our results indicate that FDO as a part of single-event multilevel surgery SEMLS provides a satisfactory mean overall correction of IRG. The results were independent of the age at the index operation and the location of the osteotomy.},
    language = {ger},
    journal = {Z Orthop Unfall},
    author = {Braatz, F. and Poljuchow, J. and Klotz, M. C. and Heitzmann, D. W. and Wolf, S. I. and Dreher, T.},
    month = dec,
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {Age Distribution, Causality, Cerebral Palsy/diagnosis/*epidemiology/*surgery, Child, Comorbidity, Female, Femur/*abnormalities/surgery, Germany/epidemiology, Hip Dislocation/diagnosis/*epidemiology/*surgery, Humans, Male, Osteotomy/*methods/statistics \& numerical data, Prognosis, Risk Factors, Treatment Outcome},
    pages = {636--42},
    annote = {1864-6743Braatz, FPoljuchow, JKlotz, M CHeitzmann, D W WWolf, S IDreher, TEnglish AbstractJournal ArticleGermanyZ Orthop Unfall. 2015 Dec;153(6):636-42. doi: 10.1055/s-0035-1557934. Epub 2015 Oct 15.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Klinik fur Unfallchirurgie und Orthopadie - Abteilung Orthopadie, Universitatsmedizin Gottingen. Klinik fur Gynakologie und Geburtshilfe, Klinik Sankt Elisabeth in Heidelberg. Klinik fur Orthopadie und Unfallchirurgie, Universitatsklinikum Heidelberg.alt-title: Zeitschrift fur Orthopadie und Unfallchirurgienumber: 6edition: 2015/10/16orig-pub: Derotation des Femurs bei Patienten mit infantiler Zerebralparese - ist das Ergebnis abhangig vom Alter zum Zeitpunkt der Operation und der OP-Technik?accession-num: 26468922remote-database-provider: NLM}
    }
  • [DOI] F. Braatz, D. Staude, M. C. Klotz, S. I. Wolf, T. Dreher, and S. Lakemeier: „Hip-joint congruity after Dega osteotomy in patients with cerebral palsy: long-term results,“ Int orthop, 2015.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{braatz_hip-joint_2015,
    title = {Hip-joint congruity after {Dega} osteotomy in patients with cerebral palsy: long-term results},
    issn = {1432-5195 (Electronic) 0341-2695 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1007/s00264-015-3013-2},
    abstract = {INTRODUCTION: Neurogenic hip dislocation is quite common in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of single-event multilevel surgery (SEMLS) in combination with hip reconstruction by using a periacetabular osteotomy as described by Dega concerning post-operative remodeling and plasticity of the femoral head post-operatively. METHODS: A total of 72 patients with CP as the primary disease and in whom a complex surgical hip reconstruction was performed during SEMLS between 1998 and 2004 were included in the study. There were 45 men and 27 women, with a median age of 7.6 (4.7-16.3) years at the time SEMLS was performed. The mean follow-up time was 7.7 years (4.9-11.8). X-rays were taken before and after surgery, and Rippstein 1 and 2 were used for follow-up. As the most reliable value for decentration, migration percentage (MP) as described by Reimers was used. To measure hip-joint cover at follow-up, the centre-edge angle was used. The hip was divided into four different categories according to sphericity and congruity. Using this approach, we could evaluate joint remodeling. RESULTS: Pre-operatively, the mean MP measured by X-ray was 68 \%. Directly after surgery, this value decreased on average by 12 \% and at the long-term follow-up was 16.0 \% on average. A high rate of incongruence was observed on X-rays taken directly after surgery: 66 hip joints were classified as incongruent. The number of aspherical and incongruent joints decreased to 54 at the follow-up examination. CONCLUSION: Data of our study with high plasticity of the hip joint suggest that even if the femoral head is deformed and a persistent incongruency after surgery is expected, hip reconstruction can be recommended.},
    journal = {Int Orthop},
    author = {Braatz, F. and Staude, D. and Klotz, M. C. and Wolf, S. I. and Dreher, T. and Lakemeier, S.},
    month = oct,
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {Cerebral palsy, Congruity, Deaga osteotomy, Hip reconstruction, Neurogenic hip dislocation, Single-event multilevel surgery},
    annote = {Braatz, FrankStaude, DanielKlotz, Matthias CWolf, Sebastian IDreher, ThomasLakemeier, StefanENG2015/10/12 06:00Int Orthop. 2015 Oct 10.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. braatz@pfh.de. Department of Trauma Surgery and Orthopedics, University Medical centre Gottingen, Gottingen, Germany. braatz@pfh.de. Juraklinik Schesslitz, Fachabteilung Chirurgie, Schesslitz, Germany. Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. Department of Trauma Surgery and Orthopedics, University Medical centre Gottingen, Gottingen, Germany.accession-num: 26454662}
    }
  • [DOI] L. Fradet, B. Liefhold, O. Rettig, T. Bruckner, M. Akbar, and S. I. Wolf: „Proposition of a protocol to evaluate upper-extremity functional deficits and compensation mechanisms: application to elbow contracture,“ J orthop sci, vol. 20, pp. 321-30, 2015.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{fradet_proposition_2015,
    title = {Proposition of a protocol to evaluate upper-extremity functional deficits and compensation mechanisms: application to elbow contracture},
    volume = {20},
    issn = {1436-2023 (Electronic) 0949-2658 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1007/s00776-014-0679-z},
    abstract = {OBJECTIVE: Instrumented gait analysis is widely accepted as an objective assessment of lower-extremity function. Conversely, upper-extremity function suffers from lack of objective evaluation. The present paper aims at proposing a protocol to be used to clinically and objectively evaluate upper-extremity function whatever the pathological joint. Secondly, it aims at better understanding the consequences on upper-extremity function and the compensation mechanisms induced by elbow contracture. Elbow contracture was simulated in this study by using a brace. DESIGN: Twelve healthy subjects followed an instrumented 3D movement analysis while performing 11 daily life movements. The movements were performed with 3 different elbow contracture conditions, simulated by wearing an adjustable elbow brace. RESULTS: The proposed protocol was successful in creating a wide range of motion at all the upper-extremity joints. The activity-related range of motion and the mean range of motion computed on the whole set of daily life movements were effective in evaluating the severity of elbow contracture. The lack of elbow flexion was compensated by trunk flexion, hand flexion and radial deviation, and combined movement of shoulder flexion, abduction, and humeral internal rotation. Deficit in elbow extension was mainly compensated by the use of trunk flexion. CONCLUSION: A protocol could be proposed for the objective evaluation of upper-extremity function. Its application to elbow contracture suggests that loss of elbow flexion affects more movements than loss of elbow extension.},
    journal = {J Orthop Sci},
    author = {Fradet, L. and Liefhold, B. and Rettig, O. and Bruckner, T. and Akbar, M. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = mar,
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {*Elbow Joint, Adaptation, Physiological, Adult, Clinical Protocols, Contracture/*diagnosis/*physiopathology, Female, Humans, Joint Diseases/diagnosis/physiopathology, Male, Movement, Range of Motion, Articular},
    pages = {321--30},
    annote = {Fradet, LaetitiaLiefhold, BeateRettig, OliverBruckner, ThomasAkbar, MichaelWolf, Sebastian IengJapan2015/01/18 06:00J Orthop Sci. 2015 Mar;20(2):321-30. doi: 10.1007/s00776-014-0679-z. Epub 2015 Jan 17.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Trauma Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany, Laetitia.Fradet@univ-poitiers.fr.number: 2accession-num: 25595687}
    }
  • [DOI] D. W. Heitzmann, K. Pieschel, M. Alimusaj, J. Block, C. Putz, and S. I. Wolf: „Functional effects of a prosthetic torsion adapter in trans-tibial amputees during unplanned spin and step turns,“ Prosthet orthot int, 2015.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{heitzmann_functional_2015,
    title = {Functional effects of a prosthetic torsion adapter in trans-tibial amputees during unplanned spin and step turns},
    issn = {1746-1553 (Electronic) 0309-3646 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1177/0309364615592698},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: Shear stress at the stump in trans-tibial amputees induced by turning movements may be reduced with the use of torsion adapters in the prosthesis. OBJECTIVE: Monitoring the motion and kinetic effects of a regular torsion adapter in comparison to a rigid placebo in unplanned spin and step turns. STUDY DESIGN: Single-blinded placebo-controlled cohort study. METHODS: In total, 10 trans-tibial amputees underwent three-dimensional gait analysis in level walking and unplanned spin and step turns with a torsion adapter and with a rigid placebo. RESULTS: Kinetic effects varied among participants. No statistically significant reduction of peak internal and peak external transverse plane moments was found for the torsion adapter in any walking condition. However, transverse plane rotation of the adapter was monitored in all participants. CONCLUSION: Motion between the socket and the residual limb may be reduced during turns due to transverse plane motion of the torsion adapter and shear stress on the residual limb may be reduced. However, there may be good and bad responders to torsion adapters due to differences in coupling between the residual limb and the socket. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Strong coupling between stump and socket will help the user controlling his prosthesis. Shear stress at the stump may increase in stump-socket interface stiffness and may be the reason for residual limb problems. Torsion adapters therefore may be beneficial for comfort and stump condition in individual cases.},
    journal = {Prosthet Orthot Int},
    author = {Heitzmann, D. W. and Pieschel, K. and Alimusaj, M. and Block, J. and Putz, C. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = jul,
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {Lower limp amputee, shear stress, stump, torsion adapter},
    annote = {Heitzmann, Daniel WwPieschel, KaiAlimusaj, MerkurBlock, JuliaPutz, CorneliaWolf, Sebastian IENG2015/07/22 06:00Prosthet Orthot Int. 2015 Jul 20. pii: 0309364615592698.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany sebastian.wolf@med.uni-heidelberg.de.accession-num: 26195621}
    }
  • [DOI] M. W. Maier, S. Lauer, S. I. Wolf, T. Dreher, M. C. Klotz, F. Zeifang, and M. Rickert: „Low preoperative Constant score is a negative predictive factor for postoperative proprioception after total shoulder arthroplasty in osteoarthritis,“ Arch orthop trauma surg, vol. 135, pp. 171-7, 2015.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{maier_low_2015,
    title = {Low preoperative {Constant} score is a negative predictive factor for postoperative proprioception after total shoulder arthroplasty in osteoarthritis},
    volume = {135},
    issn = {1434-3916 (Electronic) 0936-8051 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1007/s00402-014-2148-8},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: Shoulder proprioception in patients with glenohumeral osteoarthritis and the effect of total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) on proprioception have been evaluated previously. Measuring proprioception with an active angle reproduction (AAR) test, proprioception remained unchanged or deteriorated in a short follow-up period after shoulder replacement. Therefore, the purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the influence of the preoperative Constant score (CS) on postoperative proprioceptive outcome after TSA in patients with primary osteoarthritis to address the question of whether the preoperative state of shoulder function influences postoperative proprioceptive outcome. METHODS: Twenty-four patients who received total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) (n = 24) for primary osteoarthritis of the shoulder were enrolled. After retrospectively analyzing the preoperative CS for 120 patients with primary osteoarthritis of the shoulder who received TSA, the patient group was divided into three subgroups according to preoperative functional assessment of the shoulder using the CS. Group one consisted of patients with CS {\textless} 20, group two patients with CS 20-30, and group three patients with the best preoperative CS ({\textgreater}30). In all patients proprioception was examined 1 day before the operation and 3 months after surgery by 3D motion analysis with an AAR test and also CS. RESULTS: Postoperatively, proprioception in group one (CS {\textless} 20) deteriorated significantly from 5.2 degrees (SD 2.2) to 8.1 degrees (SD 1.8); p = 0.018. In group two, there were no significant changes from preoperative to postoperative status [8.7 degrees (SD 2.1) vs. 9.3 degrees (SD 2.7) (p = 0.554)], likewise in group three [6.3 degrees (SD 2.3) preoperatively vs. 6.9 degrees (SD 3.3) postoperatively (p = 0.617)]. Comparing the postoperative results, the best proprioception [6.9 degrees (SD 3.3)] was found in the group that had the best preoperative CS (group three, CS {\textgreater} 30). CONCLUSION: In conclusion, a low preoperative CS is a negative predictive factor for postoperative proprioception after TSA. We should keep that in mind when determining the best timepoint for shoulder replacement in patients with glenohumeral osteoarthritis.},
    journal = {Arch Orthop Trauma Surg},
    author = {Maier, M. W. and Lauer, S. and Wolf, S. I. and Dreher, T. and Klotz, M. C. and Zeifang, F. and Rickert, M.},
    month = feb,
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {*Arthroplasty, Replacement, *Health Status Indicators, *Proprioception, Aged, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Osteoarthritis/*physiopathology/surgery, Range of Motion, Articular, Retrospective Studies, Shoulder Joint/*physiopathology/surgery, Treatment Outcome},
    pages = {171--7},
    annote = {Maier, Michael WLauer, SarahWolf, Sebastian IDreher, ThomasKlotz, Matthias CZeifang, FelixRickert, MarkusengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tGermany2015/01/06 06:00Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2015 Feb;135(2):171-7. doi: 10.1007/s00402-014-2148-8. Epub 2015 Jan 4.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, D-69118, Heidelberg, Germany, m.w.maier@web.de.number: 2accession-num: 25556662}
    }
  • [DOI] M. W. Maier, F. Zeifang, M. Caspers, T. Dreher, M. C. Klotz, O. Rettig, S. I. Wolf, and P. Kasten: „Can reverse shoulder arthroplasty in post-traumatic revision surgery restore the ability to perform activities of daily living?,“ Orthop traumatol surg res, vol. 101, pp. 191-6, 2015.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{maier_can_2015,
    title = {Can reverse shoulder arthroplasty in post-traumatic revision surgery restore the ability to perform activities of daily living?},
    volume = {101},
    issn = {1877-0568 (Electronic) 1877-0568 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.otsr.2014.12.007},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: Failed shoulder arthroplasty and failed internal fixation in fractures of the proximal humerus can benefit from implantation of a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). While there is some evidence that RSA can improve function regarding range of motion (ROM), pain, satisfaction, and strength, there is sparse data how this translates into activities of daily living (ADLs). A marker-based 3D video motion analysis system has recently been designed that can measure changes of ROM in dynamic movements in every plane. The hypothesis was that a gain of maximum ROM also translates into the ability to perform ADLs and into a significant increase of ROM in ADLs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six consecutive patients (5 women, 1 man; 2x failed arthroplasty, 4x failed open reduction and internal fixation) who received RSA were examined the day before and 1 year after shoulder replacement. A 3D motion analysis system using a novel upper extremity model measured active maximum values and ROM in four ADLs. RESULTS: Comparing the pre- to the 1-year postoperative status, RSA resulted in a significant increase in mean maximum values for active flexion (humerus to thorax) of 37 degrees (S.D. +/-23 degrees ), from 50 to 87 degrees [P=0.005], and for active abduction averaging of 17 degrees (S.D. +/-13 degrees ), from 52 to 69 degrees [P=0.027]. The extension decreased significantly by about 8 degrees (S.D. +/-16 degrees ), from a mean of 39 to 31 degrees [P=0.009]. For active adduction and internal and external rotation, there were trends for improvements, but no significant changes. Only three additional tasks of the ADL (out of 13/24 preoperatively) could be performed after revision surgery. Comparing the preoperative to the postoperative ROM in the ADLs in flexion/extension, ROM improved significantly in one ("tying an apron") of four ADLs. There were no significant changes in the abduction/adduction and internal/external rotation in any ADLs. CONCLUSION: RSA in revision cases significantly improved maximum active flexion and abduction, but decreased extension in this series. However, the patients were only able to use this greater ROM to their benefit in one of four ADLs.},
    journal = {Orthop Traumatol Surg Res},
    author = {Maier, M. W. and Zeifang, F. and Caspers, M. and Dreher, T. and Klotz, M. C. and Rettig, O. and Wolf, S. I. and Kasten, P.},
    month = apr,
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {*Activities of Daily Living, *Range of Motion, Articular, Activity of daily living, Aged, Arthroplasty, Replacement/*methods, Biomechanical model, Failed arthroplasty, Failed osteosynthesis, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Fracture Fixation, Internal/*methods, Functional testing, Humans, Humerus/*injuries/surgery, Male, Marker-based system, Outcome, Postoperative Period, Reverse shoulder arthroplasty, Revision, Rotation, Shoulder Joint/injuries/physiopathology/*surgery, Time Factors, Upper extremity},
    pages = {191--6},
    annote = {Maier, M WZeifang, FCaspers, MDreher, TKlotz, M CRettig, OWolf, S IKasten, PengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tFrance2015/02/25 06:00Orthop Traumatol Surg Res. 2015 Apr;101(2):191-6. doi: 10.1016/j.otsr.2014.12.007. Epub 2015 Feb 21.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: michael.maier@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: felix.zeifang@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: mira.caspers@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: thomas.dreher@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: matthias.klotz@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: oliver.rettig@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: sebasitan.wolf@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Orthopedic Surgery Center (OCC) Tubingen, University Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse, 3, 72076 Tubingen, Germany. Electronic address: Kasten@occ-tuebingen.de.number: 2accession-num: 25707579}
    }
  • [DOI] M. Niklasch, L. Doderlein, M. C. Klotz, F. Braatz, S. I. Wolf, and T. Dreher: „Asymmetric pelvic and hip rotation in children with bilateral cerebral palsy: uni- or bilateral femoral derotation osteotomy?,“ Gait posture, vol. 41, pp. 670-5, 2015.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{niklasch_asymmetric_2015,
    title = {Asymmetric pelvic and hip rotation in children with bilateral cerebral palsy: uni- or bilateral femoral derotation osteotomy?},
    volume = {41},
    issn = {1879-2219 (Electronic) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2015.01.024},
    abstract = {Internal rotation gait is common among children with bilateral cerebral palsy. However, despite bilaterally increased femoral anteversion asymmetric internal rotation gait is often found. Femoral derotation osteotomy (FDO) is commonly performed bilaterally. Variable functional outcomes are reported especially in cases with mild internal hip rotation during gait and abnormal preoperative pelvic rotation. A major question is if a unilateral treatment of the more involved side in asymmetric cases leads to a comparable or even superior outcome. One hundred and nine children with spastic bilateral CP treated with FDO with pre- and 1-year postoperative 3D gait analysis were retrospectively collected. The asymmetry was calculated from the preoperative difference between both limbs in hip rotation obtained by 3D gait analysis. Twenty-eight children with asymmetry larger than 20 degrees were selected and classified into two groups, according to whether they obtained a unilateral or bilateral FDO. Preoperative clinical examination and pre- and postoperative hip and pelvic rotation in gait analysis on the more and the less involved side did not differ significantly between both groups. Interestingly, in both groups, hip rotation did not change significantly in less-involved limbs, although intraoperative derotation averaged 25 degrees . After unilateral FDO a significant change in pelvic rotation resulted, whereas this was not found after bilateral FDO. The results of this study suggest that unilateral FDO in children with asymmetric internal rotation gait leads to a comparable functional outcome compared to bilateral treatment. Furthermore, it was shown for the first time that considering the asymmetry has a positive effect on pelvic rotation.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Niklasch, M. and Doderlein, L. and Klotz, M. C. and Braatz, F. and Wolf, S. I. and Dreher, T.},
    month = feb,
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {Adolescent, Asymmetric internal rotation gait, Cerebral palsy, Cerebral Palsy/complications/*physiopathology, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Femoral derotation osteotomy, Femur/*surgery, Follow-Up Studies, Gait Disorders, Neurologic/etiology/physiopathology/*surgery, Gait/*physiology, Humans, Male, Osteotomy/*methods, Pelvic rotation, Pelvis/*physiopathology, Postoperative Period, Retrospective Studies, Rotation, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome},
    pages = {670--5},
    annote = {Niklasch, MDoderlein, LKlotz, M CBraatz, FWolf, S IDreher, TengEngland2015/02/24 06:00Gait Posture. 2015 Feb;41(2):670-5. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2015.01.024. Epub 2015 Feb 2.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Pediatric Orthopaedics and Foot Surgery, Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Center for Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. Orthopaedic Hospital for Children, Behandlungszentrum Aschau GmbH, Bernauerstr. 18, 83229 Aschau i. Chiemgau, Germany. Klinik fur Unfallchirurgie und Orthopadie, Universitatsmedizin Gottingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, 37075, Gottingen, Germany. Pediatric Orthopaedics and Foot Surgery, Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Center for Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: thomas.dreher@med.uni-heidelberg.de.number: 2accession-num: 25698350}
    }
  • [DOI] M. Niklasch, T. Dreher, L. Doderlein, S. I. Wolf, K. Ziegler, R. Brunner, and E. Rutz: „Superior functional outcome after femoral derotation osteotomy according to gait analysis in cerebral palsy,“ Gait posture, vol. 41, pp. 52-6, 2015.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{niklasch_superior_2015,
    title = {Superior functional outcome after femoral derotation osteotomy according to gait analysis in cerebral palsy},
    volume = {41},
    issn = {1879-2219 (Electronic) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2014.08.011},
    abstract = {The femoral derotation osteotomy (FDO) is seen as the golden standard treatment in children with cerebral palsy and internal rotation gait. Variable outcomes with cases of over- and undercorrection mainly in the less involved patients have been reported. The determination of the amount of derotation is still inconsistent. 138 patients (age: 11 (+/- 3.3) years) with cerebral palsy and internal rotation gait were examined pre- and 1 year postoperatively after distal or proximal FDO, using standardized clinical examination and 3D gait analysis. Three groups were defined retrospectively depending on the amount of derotation in relation to the mean hip rotation in stance (MHR) during gait analysis: Group A (derotation angle {\textgreater} MHR + 10 degrees ), Group B (derotation angle = MHR +/- 10 degrees ), Group C (derotation angle {\textless}MHR-10 degrees ), and compared according to their postoperative mean hip rotation. ANOVA with Bonferroni post hoc test was used for statistics (p {\textless} 0.05). Group B had the greatest benefit with the highest rate (86\%) of good results (postoperative MHR = +/- 15 degrees ). In contrast there were 14\% cases of overcorrection and 5\% cases of deterioration in Group A with only 81\% good results and only 79\% good results in Group C. It can be concluded, that it is less likely to have unsatisfactory outcomes if the amount of FDO is defined according to the findings of gait analysis compared with clinical examination.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Niklasch, M. and Dreher, T. and Doderlein, L. and Wolf, S. I. and Ziegler, K. and Brunner, R. and Rutz, E.},
    month = jan,
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {*Osteotomy/methods, Adolescent, Cerebral palsy, Cerebral Palsy/physiopathology/*surgery, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Femoral derotation osteotomy, Femur/*surgery, Gait/*physiology, Humans, Indication, Internal rotation gait, Male, Outcome, Postoperative Period, Retrospective Studies, Rotation, Treatment Outcome},
    pages = {52--6},
    annote = {Niklasch, MDreher, TDoderlein, LWolf, S IZiegler, KBrunner, RRutz, EengEvaluation StudiesEngland2014/09/14 06:00Gait Posture. 2015 Jan;41(1):52-6. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2014.08.011. Epub 2014 Aug 27.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Pediatric Orthopaedics and Foot Surgery, Clinic for Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. Pediatric Orthopaedics and Foot Surgery, Clinic for Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: thomas\_dreher@hotmail.com. Orthopaedic Hospital for Children, Behandlungszentrum Aschau GmbH, Bernauerstrasse 18, 83229 Aschau i. Chiemgau, Germany. Paediatric Orthopaedic Department, University Children's Hospital Basle (UKBB), Spitalstrasse 33, 4056 Basel, Switzerland.number: 1accession-num: 25217494}
    }
  • [DOI] M. Niklasch, S. I. Wolf, M. C. Klotz, A. Geisbusch, R. Brunner, L. Doderlein, and T. Dreher: „Factors associated with recurrence after femoral derotation osteotomy in cerebral palsy,“ Gait posture, vol. 42, pp. 460-5, 2015.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{niklasch_factors_2015,
    title = {Factors associated with recurrence after femoral derotation osteotomy in cerebral palsy},
    volume = {42},
    issn = {1879-2219 (Electronic) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2015.07.059},
    abstract = {Femoral derotation osteotomy (FDO) as gold standard treatment for internal rotation gait in cerebral palsy (CP) leads to satisfying short-term results, whereas rates of recurrence up to 33\% are reported in long-term outcome studies. The purpose of this study was therefore to identify factors contributing to recurrence of internal rotation gait in patients with CP who were treated with FDO in childhood. 70 patients (age: 10 (+/- 3.3) years at surgery) with bilateral CP and internal rotation gait were examined pre-, one year and at least five years (mean 8 +/- 2 years) postoperatively after distal or proximal FDO, using standardized clinical examination and 3D gait-analysis. 27 patients had a good hip rotation one year postoperatively (between 5 degrees external and 15 degrees internal for both limbs) and were considered for the analysis of factors contributing to recurrence of internal rotation gait. Regarding all included patients both mean hip rotation and foot progression angle improved significantly (p {\textless} 0.001) from pre- to postoperative. A significant deterioration in hip rotation (more involved side) (p {\textless} 0.001) from one year postoperatively to the long-term follow-up can be observed. Younger age, reduced hip joint impulse, increased plantar flexion and internal foot progression angle postoperatively could be identified as factors for recurrence. FDO on average leads to a satisfactory correction of internal rotation gait. In order to improve the long-term outcome after FDO the time of multilevel surgery should be indicated as late as possible and the different factors leading to potential recurrence should be considered.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Niklasch, M. and Wolf, S. I. and Klotz, M. C. and Geisbusch, A. and Brunner, R. and Doderlein, L. and Dreher, T.},
    month = oct,
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {Cerebral palsy, Femoral derotation osteotomy, Gait analysis, Internal rotation gait, Long-term outcome},
    pages = {460--5},
    annote = {Niklasch, MWolf, S IKlotz, M CGeisbusch, ABrunner, RDoderlein, LDreher, TengEngland2015/08/16 06:00Gait Posture. 2015 Oct;42(4):460-5. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2015.07.059. Epub 2015 Aug 1.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Paediatric Orthopaedics and Foot Surgery, Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Paediatric Orthopaedic Department, University Children's Hospital Basle (UKBB), Basle, Switzerland. Orthopaedic Hospital for Children, Behandlungszentrum Aschau, Aschau, Germany. Paediatric Orthopaedics and Foot Surgery, Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: thomas.dreher@med.uni-heidelberg.de.number: 4accession-num: 26276696}
    }
  • [DOI] O. Rettig, B. Krautwurst, M. W. Maier, and S. I. Wolf: „Definition of anatomical zero positions for assessing shoulder pose with 3d motion capture during bilateral abduction of the arms,“ Bmc musculoskelet disord, vol. 16, p. 383, 2015.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{rettig_definition_2015,
    title = {Definition of anatomical zero positions for assessing shoulder pose with 3D motion capture during bilateral abduction of the arms},
    volume = {16},
    issn = {1471-2474},
    doi = {10.1186/s12891-015-0840-7},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: Surgical interventions at the shoulder may alter function of the shoulder complex. Clinically, the outcome can be assessed by universal goniometry. Marker-based motion capture may not resemble these results due to differing angle definitions. METHODS: The clinical inspection of bilateral arm abduction for assessing shoulder dysfunction is performed with a marker based 3D optical measurement method. An anatomical zero position of shoulder pose is proposed to determine absolute angles according to the Neutral-0-Method as used in orthopedic context. Static shoulder positions are documented simultaneously by 3D marker tracking and universal goniometry in 8 young and healthy volunteers. Repetitive bilateral arm abduction movements of at least 150 degrees range of motion are monitored. Similarly a subject with gleno-humeral osteoarthritis is monitored for demonstrating the feasibility of the method and to illustrate possible shoulder dysfunction effects. RESULTS: With mean differences of less than 2 degrees , the proposed anatomical zero position results in good agreement between shoulder elevation/depression angles determined by 3D marker tracking and by universal goniometry in static positions. Lesser agreement is found for shoulder pro-/retraction with systematic deviations of up to 6 degrees . In the bilateral arm abduction movements the volunteers perform a common and specific pattern in clavicula-thoracic and gleno-humeral motion with maximum shoulder angles of 32 degrees elevation, 5 degrees depression and 45 degrees protraction, respectively, whereas retraction is hardly reached. Further, they all show relevant out of (frontal) plane motion with anteversion angles of 30 degrees in overhead position (maximum abduction). With increasing arm anteversion the shoulder is increasingly retroverted, with a maximum of 20 degrees retroversion. The subject with gleno-humeral osteoarthritis shows overall less shoulder abduction range of motion but with increased out-of-plane movement during abduction. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed anatomical zero definition for shoulder pose fills the missing link for determining absolute joint angles for shoulder elevation/depression and pro-/retraction. For elevation-/depression the accuracy suits clinical expectations very well with mean differences less than 2 degrees and limits of agreement of 8.6 degrees whereas for pro-/retraction the accuracy in individual cases may be inferior with limits of agreement of up to 24.6 degrees . This has critically to be kept in mind when applying this concept to shoulder intervention studies.},
    language = {eng},
    journal = {BMC Musculoskelet Disord},
    author = {Rettig, O. and Krautwurst, B. and Maier, M. W. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = dec,
    year = {2015},
    pmcid = {Pmc4673792},
    keywords = {*Anatomic Landmarks, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Arthrometry, Articular, Biomechanical Phenomena, Case-Control Studies, Feasibility Studies, Female, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional/*methods, Male, Osteoarthritis/*diagnosis/pathology/physiopathology, Predictive Value of Tests, Range of Motion, Articular, Reproducibility of Results, Shoulder/*pathology/*physiopathology, Video Recording/*methods, Young Adult},
    pages = {383},
    annote = {1471-2474Rettig, OliverKrautwurst, BrittaMaier, Michael WWolf, Sebastian IJournal ArticleValidation StudiesEnglandBMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2015 Dec 9;16:383. doi: 10.1186/s12891-015-0840-7.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200 a, 69118, Heidelberg, Germany. Oliver.Rettig@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200 a, 69118, Heidelberg, Germany. Britta.Krautwurst@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200 a, 69118, Heidelberg, Germany. Michael.Maier@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200 a, 69118, Heidelberg, Germany. Sebastian.Wolf@med.uni-heidelberg.de.alt-title: BMC musculoskeletal disordersedition: 2015/12/10accession-num: 26646907remote-database-provider: NLM}
    }

2014

  • [DOI] F. Braatz, A. Eidemuller, M. C. Klotz, N. A. Beckmann, S. I. Wolf, and T. Dreher: „Hip reconstruction surgery is successful in restoring joint congruity in patients with cerebral palsy: long-term outcome,“ Int orthop, vol. 38, pp. 2237-43, 2014.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{braatz_hip_2014,
    title = {Hip reconstruction surgery is successful in restoring joint congruity in patients with cerebral palsy: long-term outcome},
    volume = {38},
    issn = {1432-5195 (Electronic) 0341-2695 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1007/s00264-014-2379-x},
    abstract = {PURPOSE: Neurogenic hip dislocation is frequently observed in patients with cerebral palsy (CP). If the hip is not centred but not dislocated, the hip joint can be recentered with minor operative effort. Reconstructive procedures are indicated if the femoral head is subluxated or dislocated. There are no data as to when destruction of the femoral head requires a salvage procedure or whether hip reconstruction surgery is successful in restoring joint congruity in patients with CP. Our aim was to investigate femoral head plasticity after hip reconstruction surgery in a long-term outcome study. METHODS: We studied a large cohort of patients with CP and high hip dislocation (Tonnis grade IV) before surgery. Sixty-eight patients were assessed, of whom 23 presented with bilateral high hip dislocation, and 91 complex hip reconstructions were conducted. Standardised radiographic examination was performed before and directly after surgery and at the long-term follow-up examination. RESULTS: Pain was the most frequent reason for complex hip-joint reconstruction (49 patients, 72\%). An impressive improvement in pain was demonstrated postoperatively. Forty-five hip joints presented aspheric incongruity postoperatively, which improved on average 7.7 years after surgery and 59 hip joints showed congruency. Only 15\% of patients experienced pain at the time of final follow-up, and that was of low intensity. CONCLUSIONS: Early conservative treatment for hip dislocation is helpful, and operative reconstruction should also be scheduled early. Continued surveillance is necessary, and Reimers index is useful for monitoring the development of hip centering. In case of hip pain and femoral head deformity, our long-term study indicates that hip reconstruction surgery as a part of multilevel surgery improves pain and function in patients with CP and Tonnis IV hip dislocation, even if the hip joint is incongruent after operation. This incongruity improves over the long-term. If possible, a reconstruction procedure should be performed before the femoral head becomes deformed. High plasticity of the hip joint suggest that even if the femoral head is deformed, hip reconstruction can be recommended.},
    journal = {Int Orthop},
    author = {Braatz, F. and Eidemuller, A. and Klotz, M. C. and Beckmann, N. A. and Wolf, S. I. and Dreher, T.},
    month = nov,
    year = {2014},
    keywords = {Adolescent, Cerebral Palsy/*surgery, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Femur Head/surgery, Hip Dislocation/*surgery, Hip Joint/*surgery, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Osteotomy/methods, Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/*methods, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult},
    pages = {2237--43},
    annote = {Braatz, FrankEidemuller, AnnetteKlotz, Matthias CBeckmann, Nicholas AWolf, Sebastian IDreher, ThomasengGermany2014/06/28 06:00Int Orthop. 2014 Nov;38(11):2237-43. doi: 10.1007/s00264-014-2379-x. Epub 2014 Jun 27.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Clinics, Heidelberg, Germany, braatz@pfh.de.number: 11accession-num: 24968787}
    }
  • [DOI] F. Braatz, A. Eidemuller, M. C. Klotz, S. I. Wolf, and T. Dreher: „Long-term results of reconstructive surgery in infantile cerebral palsy patients with high hip dislocation: is hip screening necessary?,“ Orthopade, vol. 43, pp. 808-14, 2014.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{braatz_long-term_2014,
    title = {Long-term results of reconstructive surgery in infantile cerebral palsy patients with high hip dislocation: is hip screening necessary?},
    volume = {43},
    issn = {1433-0431 (Electronic) 0085-4530 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1007/s00132-014-2315-1},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: Hip dislocation as a result of neurogenic hip displacement is a common focal motor symptom in children with infantile cerebral palsy (ICP). In addition to contracture of the hip joint, in up to 65 \% of cases patients suffer from pain which leads to further loss of function and often to limitations in important basic functions, such as lying, care, sitting, standing and transfer. METHODS: In order to avoid hip dislocation and to be able to implement therapy at an early stage, screening programs have been developed in recent years which clearly demonstrate the risks of hip displacement in ICP depending on the ability to walk. An investigation of the natural course is practically impossible because as a rule patients with painful neurogenic hip displacement receive surgical therapy. PATIENTS: In this study 96 patients with high hip dislocation grade IV on the Tonnis classification were included and 68 could be followed up. The average age at the time of surgery was 10.9 years and the mean follow-up period was 7.7 years. In the postoperative course 6 out of 91 reconstructed hips became redislocated and a proximal femoral resection was carried out in one female patient. The migration index according to Reimers was 14.0 \% at the time of the follow-up examination. CONCLUSION: Revision procedures can be avoided by screening programs. These should be strived for so that the neuro-orthopedic treatment on operation planning is not first initiated when pain occurs and revision procedures, such as angulation osteotomy or proximal femoral resection can be avoided. The reconstruction should also involve minimal deformation of the femoral head. In order to implement this, the interdisciplinary cooperation between neuropediatricians, social pediatriatricians and neuro-orthopedists should be intensified in the future.},
    journal = {Orthopade},
    author = {Braatz, F. and Eidemuller, A. and Klotz, M. C. and Wolf, S. I. and Dreher, T.},
    month = sep,
    year = {2014},
    keywords = {*Patient Selection, *Reconstructive Surgical Procedures, Adolescent, Adult, Cerebral Palsy/*diagnosis/*surgery, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Hip Dislocation/*diagnosis/*surgery, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Mass Screening/methods, Preoperative Care/*methods, Recurrence, Reoperation, Retrospective Studies, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult},
    pages = {808--14},
    annote = {Braatz, FEidemuller, AKlotz, M CWolf, S IDreher, TgerEnglish AbstractGermany2014/05/13 06:00Orthopade. 2014 Sep;43(9):808-14. doi: 10.1007/s00132-014-2315-1.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Abteilung Orthopadie, Klinik fur Unfallchirurgie und Orthopadie, Universitatsmedizin Gottingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, 37075, Gottingen, Deutschland, braatz@pfh.de.number: 9orig-pub: Langzeitergebnisse nach operativer Rekonstruktion hoher Huftluxationen bei infantiler Zerebralparese: Ist ein Huftscreening notwendig?accession-num: 24816981}
    }
  • [DOI] T. Dreher, S. I. Wolf, D. Heitzmann, C. Fremd, M. C. Klotz, and W. Wenz: „Tibialis posterior tendon transfer corrects the foot drop component of cavovarus foot deformity in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease,“ J bone joint surg am, vol. 96, pp. 456-62, 2014.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{dreher_tibialis_2014,
    title = {Tibialis posterior tendon transfer corrects the foot drop component of cavovarus foot deformity in {Charcot}-{Marie}-{Tooth} disease},
    volume = {96},
    issn = {1535-1386 (Electronic) 0021-9355 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.2106/JBJS.L.01749},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: The foot drop component of cavovarus foot deformity in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is commonly treated by tendon transfer to provide substitute foot dorsiflexion or by tenodesis to prevent the foot from dropping. Our goals were to use three-dimensional foot analysis to evaluate the outcome of tibialis posterior tendon transfer to the dorsum of the foot and to investigate whether the transfer works as an active substitution or as a tenodesis. METHODS: We prospectively studied fourteen patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and cavovarus foot deformity in whom twenty-three feet were treated with tibialis posterior tendon transfer to correct the foot drop component as part of a foot deformity correction procedure. Five patients underwent unilateral treatment and nine underwent bilateral treatment; only one foot was analyzed in each of the latter patients. Standardized clinical examinations and three-dimensional gait analysis with a special foot model (Heidelberg Foot Measurement Method) were performed before and at a mean of 28.8 months after surgery. RESULTS: The three-dimensional gait analysis revealed significant increases in tibiotalar and foot-tibia dorsiflexion during the swing phase after surgery. These increases were accompanied by a significant reduction in maximum plantar flexion at the stance-swing transition but without a reduction in active range of motion. Passive ankle dorsiflexion measured in knee flexion and extension increased significantly without any relevant decrease in passive plantar flexion. The AOFAS (American Orthopaedic Foot \& Ankle Society) score improved significantly. CONCLUSIONS: Tibialis posterior tendon transfer was effective at correcting the foot drop component of cavovarus foot deformity in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, with the transfer apparently working as an active substitution. Although passive plantar flexion was not limited after surgery, active plantar flexion at push-off was significantly reduced and it is unknown whether this reduction was the result of a tenodesis effect or calf muscle weakness.},
    journal = {J Bone Joint Surg Am},
    author = {Dreher, T. and Wolf, S. I. and Heitzmann, D. and Fremd, C. and Klotz, M. C. and Wenz, W.},
    month = mar,
    year = {2014},
    keywords = {Adolescent, Adult, Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease/complications/physiopathology/*surgery, Female, Foot Deformities, Acquired/complications/physiopathology/*surgery, Gait Disorders, Neurologic/complications/physiopathology/*surgery, Gait/physiology, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Range of Motion, Articular/physiology, Tendon Transfer/*methods, Treatment Outcome},
    pages = {456--62},
    annote = {Dreher, TWolf, S IHeitzmann, DFremd, CKlotz, M CWenz, Weng2014/03/22 06:00J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2014 Mar 19;96(6):456-62. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.L.01749.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Division for Paediatric Orthopaedics and Foot Surgery, Department for Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Clinics, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. Email addresses for T. Dreher: thomas\_dreher@hotmail.com; thomas. Foot Surgery and Paediatric Orthopaedics, ATOS Clinic, Heidelberg, Germany.number: 6accession-num: 24647501}
    }
  • [DOI] M. C. Klotz, S. van Drongelen, O. Rettig, P. Wenger, S. Gantz, T. Dreher, and S. I. Wolf: „Motion analysis of the upper extremity in children with unilateral cerebral palsy–an assessment of six daily tasks,“ Res dev disabil, vol. 35, pp. 2950-7, 2014.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{klotz_motion_2014,
    title = {Motion analysis of the upper extremity in children with unilateral cerebral palsy--an assessment of six daily tasks},
    volume = {35},
    issn = {1873-3379 (Electronic) 0891-4222 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.ridd.2014.07.021},
    abstract = {Restrictions in range of motion of the upper extremity are common in patients with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP). The purpose of this study was to investigate movement deviations of the upper extremity in children with unilateral CP by means of 3D motion capture as well as by the use of easy to use scores and questionnaires (MACS, MRC, MAS, ABILHAND-Kids). 16 children with a spastic, unilateral CP were included and compared to a group of 17 typically developing adolescents (TD). The movement time and range of motion (ROM) of six uni- and bimanual daily tasks were compared and correlated with the scores and questionnaires. Movement times increased significantly with involvement according to MACS in all tasks. The restrictions in ROM were pronounced in the forearm. As a compensatory mechanism the children of the MACS 2 and 3 groups showed increased trunk movement. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between the MACS and the ABILHAND-Kids Questionnaire. In contrast to previous studies, which reported a correlation between the restrictions in ROM and the MACS, this study showed no consistent correlation between the restrictions in ROM neither with the MACS nor with the ABILHAND-Kids. While the MACS and the ABILHAND-Kids function as a simple rating tool for clinical use, the detailed analysis of different daily tasks using 3-D-motion capture provides more detailed information about the movement deviations and spatiotemporal parameters.},
    journal = {Res Dev Disabil},
    author = {Klotz, M. C. and van Drongelen, S. and Rettig, O. and Wenger, P. and Gantz, S. and Dreher, T. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = nov,
    year = {2014},
    keywords = {*Activities of Daily Living, Adolescent, Arm/*physiopathology, Biomechanical Phenomena, Case-Control Studies, Cerebral palsy, Cerebral Palsy/*physiopathology, Child, Children, Female, Humans, Male, Motion analysis, Range of Motion, Articular/physiology, Torso/*physiopathology, Unilateral, Upper extremity},
    pages = {2950--7},
    annote = {Klotz, Matthias C Mvan Drongelen, StefanRettig, OliverWenger, PatrickGantz, SimoneDreher, ThomasWolf, Sebastian Ieng2014/08/13 06:00Res Dev Disabil. 2014 Nov;35(11):2950-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2014.07.021. Epub 2014 Aug 9.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: matthias.klotz@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: stefan.vandrongelen@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: oliver.rettig@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: patrick.wenger@bgu-ludwigshafen.de. Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: simone.gantz@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: thomas.dreher@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: sebastian.wolf@med.uni-heidelberg.de.number: 11accession-num: 25112796}
    }
  • [DOI] M. C. Klotz, S. I. Wolf, D. Heitzmann, M. W. Maier, F. Braatz, and T. Dreher: „The association of equinus and primary genu recurvatum gait in cerebral palsy,“ Res dev disabil, vol. 35, pp. 1357-63, 2014.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{klotz_association_2014,
    title = {The association of equinus and primary genu recurvatum gait in cerebral palsy},
    volume = {35},
    issn = {1873-3379 (Electronic) 0891-4222 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.ridd.2014.03.032},
    abstract = {Primary genu recurvatum (GR) is less investigated and data presenting the prevalence among patients with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy (BSCP) is lacking in the literature. Equinus is mentioned as one of the main underlying factors in GR, but its influence on the severity and onset type of GR is mainly unanswered, yet. Hence, the purpose of this retrospective study was to assess the prevalence of GR in a large sample size in children with BSCP and to investigate sagittal plane kinematics to evaluate the influence of equinus on different GR types using data of three-dimensional gait analysis. GR was defined as a knee hyperextension of more than one standard deviation of an age matched control group during stance phase in either one or both of the limbs. Primary GR was defined as a GR without having previous surgery regarding the lower extremity, no selective dorsal rhizotomy and/or interventions like botulinum toxin injection, shock wave therapy or serial casting during the last 6 months in the patient history. In a retrospective study 463 patients with BSCP (GMFCS Level I-III) received three-dimensional gait analysis and were scanned for the presence of primary GR. Finally, 37 patients (23 males, 14 females) matched the determined inclusion criteria and were therefore included for further analysis in this study. Out of those patients seven walked with orthoses or a walker and were excluded from further statistical comparison: Kinematics of the lower limbs were compared between patients having severe (knee hyperextension{\textgreater}15 degrees ) and moderate (knee hyperextension 5-15 degrees ) GR and between patients showing an early (first half of stance phase) and a late (second half of stance phase) GR. Primary GR was present in 37 patients/52 limbs (prevalence 8.0/5.6\%). Severe GR was associated with a decreased ankle dorsiflexion compared with moderate GR. Early GR showed an increased knee hyperextension compared to late GR. In conclusion GR is less frequent compared with crouch or stiff gait. Our findings support the importance of equinus as a major underlying factor in primary GR. In this context the influence of equinus seems to be more important in early GR.},
    journal = {Res Dev Disabil},
    author = {Klotz, M. C. and Wolf, S. I. and Heitzmann, D. and Maier, M. W. and Braatz, F. and Dreher, T.},
    month = jun,
    year = {2014},
    keywords = {Adolescent, Biomechanical Phenomena, Cerebral palsy, Cerebral Palsy/complications/*physiopathology, Child, Children, Cohort Studies, Equinus, Equinus Deformity/complications/*physiopathology, Female, Gait Disorders, Neurologic/etiology/*physiopathology, Genu recurvatum, Humans, Kinematics, Knee Joint/abnormalities/*physiopathology, Male, Motion analysis, Range of Motion, Articular/physiology, Retrospective Studies},
    pages = {1357--63},
    annote = {Klotz, Matthias C MWolf, Sebastian IHeitzmann, DanielMaier, Michael WBraatz, FrankDreher, Thomaseng2014/04/08 06:00Res Dev Disabil. 2014 Jun;35(6):1357-63. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2014.03.032. Epub 2014 Apr 3.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Clinics, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: matthias.klotz@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Clinics, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: sebastian.wolf@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Clinics, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: Daniel.heitzmann@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Clinics, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: michael.maier@med.uni-heidelberg.de. Department of Trauma Surgery and Orthopaedics, University Medical Center Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany. Electronic address: braatz@pfh.de. Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Clinics, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: thomas.dreher@med.uni-heidelberg.de.number: 6accession-num: 24705489}
    }
  • [DOI] B. Kuni, S. I. Wolf, F. Zeifang, and M. Thomsen: „Foot kinematics in walking on a level surface and on stairs in patients with hallux rigidus before and after cheilectomy,“ J foot ankle res, vol. 7, p. 13, 2014.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{kuni_foot_2014,
    title = {Foot kinematics in walking on a level surface and on stairs in patients with hallux rigidus before and after cheilectomy},
    volume = {7},
    issn = {1757-1146 (Electronic) 1757-1146 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1186/1757-1146-7-13},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: Walking down stairs is a clinically relevant daily activity for older persons. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the impact of cheilectomy on walking on level ground and on stairs. METHODS: 3D motion analysis of foot kinematics was performed in eight patients with hallux rigidus and 11 healthy control participants with a 12-camera system, using the Heidelberg foot measurement method before and one year after surgery. The clinical results were documented using the AOFAS Scale. RESULTS: The range of motion of the first metatarsophalangeal joint did not improve after the operation under any gait condition. Preoperatively, hallux dorsi-/plantarflexion in level walking was 11.9 degrees lower in patients than in controls (p = 0.006), postoperatively 14.5 degrees lower (p = 0.004). Comparing walking conditions in patients, hallux dorsi-/plantarflexion was significantly higher in level walking than in climbing stairs (difference up stairs - level: -8.1 degrees , p = 0.018).The AOFAS Scale improved significantly from 56.9 +/- 19.9 points (mean +/- SD), preoperatively, to 75.9 +/- 13.9 points, postoperatively (p = 0.027). CONCLUSIONS: Cheilectomy is appropriate for reducing symptoms of hallux rigidus. However, neither a positive influence on the range of motion in walking on level ground and on stairs nor a functional improvement was observed in this group of patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01804491.},
    journal = {J Foot Ankle Res},
    author = {Kuni, B. and Wolf, S. I. and Zeifang, F. and Thomsen, M.},
    year = {2014},
    pmcid = {PMC3925775},
    pages = {13},
    annote = {Kuni, BenitaWolf, Sebastian ImmanuelZeifang, FelixThomsen, MarcengEngland2014/02/15 06:00J Foot Ankle Res. 2014 Feb 13;7(1):13. doi: 10.1186/1757-1146-7-13.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Department of Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstr, 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. benita@kuni.org.number: 1accession-num: 24524773}
    }
  • [DOI] M. W. Maier, M. Caspers, F. Zeifang, T. Dreher, M. C. Klotz, S. I. Wolf, and P. Kasten: „How does reverse shoulder replacement change the range of motion in activities of daily living in patients with cuff tear arthropathy? A prospective optical 3d motion analysis study,“ Arch orthop trauma surg, vol. 134, pp. 1065-71, 2014.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{maier_how_2014,
    title = {How does reverse shoulder replacement change the range of motion in activities of daily living in patients with cuff tear arthropathy? {A} prospective optical 3D motion analysis study},
    volume = {134},
    issn = {1434-3916 (Electronic) 0936-8051 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1007/s00402-014-2015-7},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) can improve function in cuff tear arthropathy (CTA) shoulders, but limited exact data are available about the maximum values in 3D motion analysis, and as to how improvements translate into the normal range of motion (ROM) in activities of daily living (ADLs). METHODS: This study included nine consecutive patients (n = 9) who received RSA for CTA without muscle transfers. We measured shoulder movement by a novel 3D motion analysis using the Heidelberg upper extremity model (HUX) which can eliminate compensatory movements of the scapula, and the trunk. The measurement included active maximum values, and four ADLs. RESULTS: Comparing the pre- to the 1-year postoperative status, RSA was associated with a significant increase in the mean maximum values for active flexion of about 43 degrees (SD +/- 31) from 66 degrees to 109 degrees (p = 0.001), for active abduction of about 37 degrees (SD +/- 26) from 57 degrees to 94 degrees (p = 0.001), and for the active adduction of about 28 degrees (SD +/- 10) from 5 degrees to 33 degrees (p = 0.002). Comparing the preoperative to the postoperative ROM in the ADLs in flexion/extension, ROM improved significantly in all ADLs, in abduction/adduction in three of four ADLs. No significant changes were observed in internal/external rotation in any ADLs. CONCLUSION: RSA improves the active maximum ROM for flexion, abduction, and adduction. The patients are able to take advantage of this ROM increase in ADLs in flexion and in most ADL in abduction, but only in trend in internal and external rotation.},
    journal = {Arch Orthop Trauma Surg},
    author = {Maier, M. W. and Caspers, M. and Zeifang, F. and Dreher, T. and Klotz, M. C. and Wolf, S. I. and Kasten, P.},
    month = aug,
    year = {2014},
    keywords = {*Activities of Daily Living, Aged, Arthroplasty, Replacement/*methods, Biomechanical Phenomena, Female, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Male, Osteoarthritis/*physiopathology, Prospective Studies, Range of Motion, Articular/*physiology, Rotation, Rotator Cuff/*injuries, Rupture/physiopathology, Shoulder Joint/*physiopathology/*surgery, Video Recording},
    pages = {1065--71},
    annote = {Maier, Michael WCaspers, MiraZeifang, FelixDreher, ThomasKlotz, Matthias CWolf, Sebastian IKasten, PhilipengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tGermany2014/06/14 06:00Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2014 Aug;134(8):1065-71. doi: 10.1007/s00402-014-2015-7. Epub 2014 Jun 13.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118, Heidelberg, Germany, m.w.maier@web.de.number: 8accession-num: 24925098}
    }
  • [DOI] M. W. Maier, P. Kasten, M. Niklasch, T. Dreher, F. Zeifang, O. Rettig, and S. I. Wolf: „3d motion capture using the HUX model for monitoring functional changes with arthroplasty in patients with degenerative osteoarthritis,“ Gait posture, vol. 39, pp. 7-11, 2014.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{maier_3d_2014,
    title = {3D motion capture using the {HUX} model for monitoring functional changes with arthroplasty in patients with degenerative osteoarthritis},
    volume = {39},
    issn = {1879-2219 (Electronic) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2013.07.111},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: Although shoulder hemiarthroplasty (SHA) can improve function in osteoarthritic shoulders, the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL) may remain impaired. Shoulder surgeons routinely measure parameters such as range of motion, pain, satisfaction and strength. A common subjective assessment of ADL is part of the Constant Score (CS). However, there is limited objective evidence on whether or not shoulder hemiarthroplasty can restore normal range of motion (ROM) in ADL. METHODS: The study included eight consecutive patients (n=8; seven women, one man), who underwent SHA for glenohumeral osteoarthritis. The patients were examined the day before, as well as 6 months and 3 years after shoulder replacement. They were compared with a control group with no shoulder pathology, and shoulder movement was measured with 3D motion analysis using the "Heidelberg Upper Extremity" (HUX) model. Measurements included static maximum values and four ADL. RESULTS: Comparing the preoperative to the 3-year postoperative static maximum values, there were significant improvements for abduction from 50.5 degrees (SD +/- 3 2.4 degrees ) to 72.4 degrees (SD +/- 38.2 degrees ; p=0.031), for adduction from 6.2 degrees (SD +/- 7.7 degrees ) to 66.7 degrees (SD +/- 18.0 degrees ; p=0.008), for external rotation from 15.1 degrees (SD +/- 27.9 degrees ) to 50.9 degrees (SD +/- 27.3 degrees ; p=0.031), and for internal rotation from -0.6 degrees (SD +/- 3.9 degrees ) to 35.8 degrees (SD +/- 28.2 degrees ; p=0.031). There was a trend of improvement for flexion from 105.8 degrees (SD +/- 45.7 degrees ) to 161.9 degrees (SD +/- 78.2 degrees ; p=0.094) and for extension from 20.6 degrees (SD +/- 17.0 degrees ) to 28.0 degrees (SD +/- 12.5 degrees ; p=0.313). The comparison of the 3-year postoperative ROM between the SHA group and controls showed significant differences in abduction; 3-year postoperative SHA ROM 72.4 degrees (SD +/- 38.2 degrees ) vs. 113.5 degrees (SD +/- 29.7 degrees ) among controls (p=0.029). There were no significant differences compared to the control group in adduction, flexion/extension and rotation 3 years after SHA surgery. In performing the ADL, the pre- to the 6-month and 3-year postoperative status of the SHA group resulted in a significant increase in ROM in all planes (p{\textless}0.05). Comparing the preoperative to the 3-year postoperative ROM used in ADL, there was an improvement in the flexion/extension plane, showing an improvement trend from preoperative 85 degrees -0 degrees -25 degrees to postoperative 127 degrees -0 degrees -38 degrees (p=0.063). In comparison, controls used a significantly greater ROM during ADL with mean flexion/extension of 139 degrees -0 degrees -63 degrees (p=0.028). For the abduction/adduction plane, ROM improved significantly from preoperative 25 degrees -0 degrees -19 degrees to postoperative 78 degrees -0 degrees -60 degrees (p=0.031). In comparison to controls with abduction/adduction of 118 degrees -0 degrees -37 degrees 3 years postoperative, the SHA group also used significantly less ROM in the abduction/adduction plane (p=0.028). CONCLUSION: While SHA improves ROM in ADL in patients with degenerative glenohumeral osteoarthritis, it does not restore the full ROM available for performing ADL compared to controls. 3D motion analysis with the HUX model is an appropriate measurement system to detect surgery-related changes in shoulder arthroplasty.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Maier, M. W. and Kasten, P. and Niklasch, M. and Dreher, T. and Zeifang, F. and Rettig, O. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = jan,
    year = {2014},
    keywords = {*Activities of Daily Living, *Imaging, Three-Dimensional, 3D motion analysis, Activity of daily living, Arthroplasty, Replacement/*methods, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Male, Marker-based system, Middle Aged, Osteoarthritis/physiopathology/*surgery, Range of Motion, Articular/*physiology, Shoulder hemiarthroplasty, Shoulder Joint/*physiopathology/surgery, Shoulder/physiopathology, Upper extremity},
    pages = {7--11},
    annote = {Maier, Michael WKasten, PhilipNiklasch, MirjamDreher, ThomasZeifang, FelixRettig, OliverWolf, Sebastian IengComparative StudyEngland2013/08/13 06:00Gait Posture. 2014 Jan;39(1):7-11. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2013.07.111. Epub 2013 Aug 6.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: michael.maier@med.uni-heidelberg.de.number: 1accession-num: 23931848}
    }
  • [DOI] M. W. Maier, M. Niklasch, T. Dreher, F. Zeifang, O. Rettig, M. C. Klotz, S. I. Wolf, and P. Kasten: „Motion patterns in activities of daily living: 3- year longitudinal follow-up after total shoulder arthroplasty using an optical 3d motion analysis system,“ Bmc musculoskelet disord, vol. 15, p. 244, 2014.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{maier_motion_2014,
    title = {Motion patterns in activities of daily living: 3- year longitudinal follow-up after total shoulder arthroplasty using an optical 3D motion analysis system},
    volume = {15},
    issn = {1471-2474 (Electronic) 1471-2474 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1186/1471-2474-15-244},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: Total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) can improve function in osteoarthritic shoulders, but the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) can still remain impaired. Routinely, shoulder surgeons measure range of motion (ROM) using a goniometer. Objective data are limited, however, concerning functional three-dimensional changes in ROM in ADLs after TSA in patients with degenerative glenohumeral osteoarthritis. METHODS: This study included ten consecutive patients, who received TSA for primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis. The patients were examined the day before, 6 months, and 3 years after shoulder replacement as well. We compared them with a control group (n = 10) without any shoulder pathology and measured shoulder movement by 3D motion analysis using a novel 3 D model. The measurement included static maximum values, the ability to perform and the ROM of the ADLs "combing the hair", "washing the opposite armpit", "tying an apron", and "taking a book from a shelf". RESULTS: Six months after surgery, almost all TSA patients were able to perform the four ADLs (3 out of 40 tasks could not be performed by the 10 patients); 3 years postoperatively all patients were able to carry out all ADLs (40 out of 40 tasks possible). In performing the ADLs, comparison of the pre- with the 6-month and 3-year postoperative status of the TSA group showed that the subjects did not fully use the available maximum flexion/extension ROM in performing the four ADLs. The ROM used for flexion/extension did not change significantly (preoperatively 135 degrees -0 degrees -34 degrees vs. 3 years postoperatively 131 degrees -0 degrees -53 degrees ). For abduction/adduction, ROM improved significantly from 33 degrees -0 degrees -27 degrees preoperatively to 76 degrees -0 degrees -35 degrees postoperatively. Compared to the controls (118 degrees ) the TSA group used less ROM for abduction to perform the four ADLs 3 years postoperatively. CONCLUSION: TSA improves the ability to perform ADL and the individual ROM in ADLs in patients with degenerative glenohumeral osteoarthritis over the course of 3 years. However, TSA patients do not use their maximum available abduction ROM in performing ADLs. This is not related to limitations in active ROM, but rather may be caused by pathologic motion patterns, impaired proprioception or both.},
    journal = {BMC Musculoskelet Disord},
    author = {Maier, M. W. and Niklasch, M. and Dreher, T. and Zeifang, F. and Rettig, O. and Klotz, M. C. and Wolf, S. I. and Kasten, P.},
    year = {2014},
    pmcid = {PMC4114099},
    keywords = {*Activities of Daily Living, *Arthroplasty, Replacement/adverse effects, *Physical Examination, Aged, Biomechanical Phenomena, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Osteoarthritis/diagnosis/physiopathology/*surgery, Predictive Value of Tests, Range of Motion, Articular, Recovery of Function, Shoulder Joint/physiopathology/*surgery, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome},
    pages = {244},
    annote = {Maier, Michael WNiklasch, MirjamDreher, ThomasZeifang, FelixRettig, OliverKlotz, Matthias CWolf, Sebastian IKasten, PhilipengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEngland2014/07/23 06:00BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2014 Jul 21;15:244. doi: 10.1186/1471-2474-15-244.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. m.w.maier@web.de.accession-num: 25048533}
    }
  • [DOI] S. I. Wolf, R. Mikut, A. Kranzl, and T. Dreher: „Which functional impairments are the main contributors to pelvic anterior tilt during gait in individuals with cerebral palsy?,“ Gait posture, vol. 39, pp. 359-64, 2014.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{wolf_which_2014,
    title = {Which functional impairments are the main contributors to pelvic anterior tilt during gait in individuals with cerebral palsy?},
    volume = {39},
    issn = {1879-2219 (Electronic) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2013.08.014},
    abstract = {While past investigations focused on describing pelvic motion patterns in the frontal and transversal plane, the sagittal plane "double bump" pattern commonly found in children with cerebral palsy was only rarely investigated, especially concerning the underlying pathology. 375 ambulatory (GMFCS I-III) patients with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy were included in this study. Gait and clinical data (ROM, strength, spasticity) were classified in two different ways: (a) into two groups of normal and enhanced mean anterior pelvic tilt and (b) into two groups of moderate and excessive ROM in pelvic tilt. The results reveal that increased mean pelvic tilt is mainly associated with gait features of reduced hip extension and increased pelvic and trunk obliquity ROM but with increased knee ROM. In the clinical exam this corresponds to a smaller passive knee extension deficit and reduced knee flexor strength. It seems that flexors to extensors strength imbalance at the knee is a major feature why mean pelvic position is tilted anterior whereas maximum passive hip extension is of minor importance. Contrarily, excessive sagittal pelvic ROM is associated with increased knee flexion at initial contact and reduced knee ROM. Furthermore, Duncan-Ely- and Tardieu-tests show both increased values in this group with excessive pelvic range of motion indicating for spastic rectus femoris activation. The results of our study indicate that the two gait variables are influenced by different specific mechanisms which are now described for the first time. Since the pelvis plays a central role during gait, these findings should be considered when planning single event multilevel surgery in patients with cerebral palsy.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Wolf, S. I. and Mikut, R. and Kranzl, A. and Dreher, T.},
    year = {2014},
    keywords = {Biomechanical Phenomena, Case-Control Studies, Cerebral palsy, Cerebral Palsy/complications/*physiopathology, Cluster Analysis, Double bump, Gait analysis, Gait Disorders, Neurologic/etiology/*physiopathology, Gait pattern, Hip Joint/physiopathology, Humans, Knee Joint/physiopathology, Muscle, Skeletal/physiopathology, Pelvic tilt, Pelvis/*physiopathology, Quadriceps Muscle/*physiopathology, Range of Motion, Articular/*physiology, Torso/physiopathology},
    pages = {359--64},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Heidelberg University Clinics, Department for Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 66118 Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: sebastian.wolf@med.uni-heidelberg.de.number: 1accession-num: 24054350},
    annote = {Wolf, Sebastian IMikut, RalfKranzl, AndreasDreher, ThomasengEngland2013/09/24 06:00Gait Posture. 2014;39(1):359-64. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2013.08.014. Epub 2013 Sep 2.}
    }

2013

  • [DOI] C. Auer, S. Kallus, U. Eisenmann, J. Korber, S. I. Wolf, and H. Dickhaus: „An Experimental Setup for Instrumental Analysis of Femoral Derotation Osteotomy,“ Biomed tech (berl), 2013.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{auer_experimental_2013,
    title = {An {Experimental} {Setup} for {Instrumental} {Analysis} of {Femoral} {Derotation} {Osteotomy}},
    issn = {1862-278X (Electronic) 0013-5585 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1515/bmt-2013-4302},
    journal = {Biomed Tech (Berl)},
    author = {Auer, C. and Kallus, S. and Eisenmann, U. and Korber, J. and Wolf, S. I. and Dickhaus, H.},
    month = sep,
    year = {2013},
    annote = {Auer, CKallus, SEisenmann, UKorber, JWolf, S IDickhaus, HENG2013/09/18 06:00Biomed Tech (Berl). 2013 Sep 7. pii: /j/bmte.2013.58.issue-s1-M/bmt-2013-4302/bmt-2013-4302.xml. doi: 10.1515/bmt-2013-4302.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:alt-title: Biomedizinische Technik. Biomedical engineeringaccession-num: 24043016}
    }
  • [DOI] F. Braatz, S. I. Wolf, A. Gerber, M. C. Klotz, and T. Dreher: „Do changes in torsional magnetic resonance imaging reflect improvement in gait after femoral derotation osteotomy in patients with cerebral palsy?,“ Int orthop, vol. 37, pp. 2193-8, 2013.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{braatz_changes_2013,
    title = {Do changes in torsional magnetic resonance imaging reflect improvement in gait after femoral derotation osteotomy in patients with cerebral palsy?},
    volume = {37},
    issn = {1432-5195 (Electronic) 0341-2695 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1007/s00264-013-2054-7},
    abstract = {PURPOSE: Femoral derotation osteotomy (FDO) is commonly used to correct internal rotation gait (IRG) in spastic diplegia. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the extent of intraoperative derotation is reflected in changes in static (clinical ROM and anteversion angle measured on torsional MRI) and dynamic parameters (transverse plane kinematics in three-dimensional gait analysis) after FDO in children with spastic diplegia. METHODS: In a prospective study, 30 children with spastic diplegia and IRG were treated with FDO as part of a multilevel surgery and were examined pre- and postoperatively clinically, by three-dimensional gait analysis and by torsional MRI according to a standardised protocol. RESULTS: A correlation (r = 0.317, p = 0.015) between the extent of intraoperative derotation and mean hip rotation in stance as well as the anteversion angle measured on torsional MRI (r = 0.454, p {\textless} 0.001) was found. However, no significant correlation was observed between anteversion angle (tMRI) and mean hip rotation in stance, either before or after FDO. CONCLUSIONS: Significant improvements were found in IRG after FDO, confirming the results of previous studies. There was no correlation between the anteversion measured on MRI and the mean hip rotation in stance in 3D gait analysis before or after FDO. Thus, the data suggest that if the intraoperative extent of derotation is determined only by the anteversion angle, the result will not be better after FDO. It might only help to avoid retroversion and indicate the maximum amount of femoral derotation. In this study the extent of the intraoperative derotation was orientated at the preoperative midpoint of rotation. Based on the small, but significant correlation between the clinical midpoint and the mean hip rotation in stance in the gait analysis, determination of the intraoperative extent of derotation according to the mean hip rotation in stance seems to give the best results.},
    journal = {Int Orthop},
    author = {Braatz, F. and Wolf, S. I. and Gerber, A. and Klotz, M. C. and Dreher, T.},
    month = nov,
    year = {2013},
    pmcid = {PMC3824891},
    keywords = {Adolescent, Cerebral Palsy/*physiopathology/*surgery, Child, Female, Femur/pathology/*surgery, Gait/*physiology, Hip Joint/pathology/physiology, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging/*methods, Male, Osteotomy/*methods, Postoperative Period, Preoperative Period, Prospective Studies, Range of Motion, Articular/physiology, Rotation, Torsion, Mechanical, Treatment Outcome},
    pages = {2193--8},
    annote = {Braatz, FrankWolf, Sebastian IGerber, AnnetteKlotz, Matthias CDreher, ThomasengComparative StudyEvaluation StudiesGermany2013/08/21 06:00Int Orthop. 2013 Nov;37(11):2193-8. doi: 10.1007/s00264-013-2054-7. Epub 2013 Aug 18.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Trauma Surgery and Orthopaedics, University Medical Center Gottingen, Gottingen, Germany, Braatz@pfh.de.number: 11accession-num: 23955818}
    }
  • [DOI] T. Dreher, R. Brunner, D. Vegvari, D. Heitzmann, S. Gantz, M. W. Maier, F. Braatz, and S. I. Wolf: „The effects of muscle-tendon surgery on dynamic electromyographic patterns and muscle tone in children with cerebral palsy,“ Gait posture, vol. 38, pp. 215-20, 2013.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{dreher_effects_2013,
    title = {The effects of muscle-tendon surgery on dynamic electromyographic patterns and muscle tone in children with cerebral palsy},
    volume = {38},
    issn = {1879-2219 (Electronic) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.11.013},
    abstract = {During multilevel surgery, muscle-tendon lengthening (MTL) is commonly carried out in children with cerebral palsy. However, it is unclear if MTL also modifies increased muscle tone and if pathologic activation patterns are changed as an indirect effect of the biomechanical changes. Since investigations addressing this issue are limited, this study aimed at evaluating the effects of MTL on muscle tone and activation pattern. Forty-two children with spastic diplegia who were treated by MTL underwent standardized muscle tone testing (modified Ashworth and Tardieu test), dynamic EMG and three-dimensional gait analysis before, one and three years after MTL. For the evaluation of muscle activation patterns the norm-distance of dynamic EMG data was analyzed. Range of motion and joint alignment in clinical examination were found to be significantly improved one year after MTL. However, deterioration of these parameters was noted after three years. Muscle tone was significantly reduced one year postoperatively but showed an increase after three years. Joint kinematics were found significantly closer to reference data of age matched controls initially after surgery, but deteriorated until three years postoperatively. However, the EMG patterns of the muscles which were surgically addressed were found to be unchanged in either follow-up. These findings suggest that despite the influence of MTS on biomechanics and physiology (muscle tone reduction and improvements of joint mobility and gait pattern) MTS does not change abnormal patterns of muscle activation. Recurrence of increased muscle tone and deterioration of kinematic parameters three years after surgery may be attributed to these persistent pathologic activation patterns.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Dreher, T. and Brunner, R. and Vegvari, D. and Heitzmann, D. and Gantz, S. and Maier, M. W. and Braatz, F. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = jun,
    year = {2013},
    keywords = {*Electromyography, *Muscle Tonus, *Tenotomy, Adolescent, Ashworth scale, Biomechanical Phenomena, Cerebral palsy, Cerebral Palsy/complications/*surgery, Child, Dynamic electromyography, Female, Gait, Gait analysis, Gait Disorders, Neurologic/etiology/*surgery, Humans, Male, Muscle lengthening surgery, Muscle, Skeletal/physiology/physiopathology/*surgery, Muscle Spasticity/etiology/*surgery, Muscle tone, Patterns of muscle activation, Range of Motion, Articular, Retrospective Studies, Tendons/*surgery, Treatment Outcome},
    pages = {215--20},
    annote = {Dreher, TBrunner, RVegvari, DHeitzmann, DGantz, SMaier, M WBraatz, FWolf, S IengEngland2012/12/12 06:00Gait Posture. 2013 Jun;38(2):215-20. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.11.013. Epub 2012 Dec 8.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. thomas.dreher@med.uni-heidelberg.denumber: 2accession-num: 23228624}
    }
  • [DOI] T. Dreher, D. Vegvari, S. L. Wolf, M. Klotz, S. Muller, D. Metaxiotis, W. Wenz, L. Doderlein, and F. Braatz: „Long-term effects after conversion of biarticular to monoarticular muscles compared with musculotendinous lengthening in children with spastic diplegia,“ Gait posture, vol. 37, pp. 430-5, 2013.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{dreher_long-term_2013,
    title = {Long-term effects after conversion of biarticular to monoarticular muscles compared with musculotendinous lengthening in children with spastic diplegia},
    volume = {37},
    issn = {1879-2219 (Electronic) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.08.020},
    abstract = {Adverse effects such as increased anterior pelvic tilt (APT) are reported after muscle-tendon lengthening (MTL) for the correction of flexed knee gait in cerebral palsy. The conversion of biarticular muscles (CBM) to monoarticular muscles represents an alternative treatment, but only few short-term results have been published, without comparison with MTL. The long-term outcome of 21 diplegic patients treated with CBM in a prospective study was compared with the results in MTL patients in a matched-pair analysis. Standardized clinical examination and three-dimensional gait analysis were done before surgery, 1 year thereafter, and at long-term follow-up a mean of 9.2 years postoperatively. Mean APT increased one year after surgery in both groups. This increase was higher in MTL patients and statistically significant only for this group. Knee flexion at initial contact and minimum knee flexion in stance were significantly decreased in both groups, while in swing the CBM group tended to show more of a decrease in knee flexion but at the cost of reduced peak flexion. Both groups showed deterioration of kinematic knee parameters through to long-term follow-up; the favourable effects of CBM disappeared, and the two groups displayed comparable average pelvic and knee kinematics. Considering individual patterns the prevalence of increased APT was lower in the CBM group 1 year after surgery, indicating that sparing the semitendinosus may have a positive effect on pelvic stability. However, after 9 years 30\% of the patients in both groups showed increased APT indicative of persistent hamstring insufficiency. These results demonstrate that CBM, a significantly more extensive procedure, has no long-term advantage over MTL.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Dreher, T. and Vegvari, D. and Wolf, S. L. and Klotz, M. and Muller, S. and Metaxiotis, D. and Wenz, W. and Doderlein, L. and Braatz, F.},
    month = mar,
    year = {2013},
    pages = {430--5},
    annote = {Dreher, ThomasVegvari, DoraWolf, Sebastian LKlotz, MatthiasMuller, SebastianMetaxiotis, DimitriosWenz, WolframDoderlein, LeonhardBraatz, FrankengEngland2012/09/29 06:00Gait Posture. 2013 Mar;37(3):430-5. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.08.020. Epub 2012 Sep 25.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Paediatric Orthopaedics and Foot Surgery, Department for Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Clinics, Heidelberg, Germany. thomas.dreher@med.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: Gait \& posturenumber: 3accession-num: 23018029}
    }
  • [DOI] D. W. Heitzmann, M. Guenther, B. Becher, M. Alimusaj, J. Block, S. van Drongelen, T. Dreher, F. Braatz, and S. I. Wolf: „Integrating strength tests of amputees within the protocol of conventional clinical gait analysis: a novel approach,“ Biomed tech (berl), vol. 58, pp. 195-204, 2013.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{heitzmann_integrating_2013,
    title = {Integrating strength tests of amputees within the protocol of conventional clinical gait analysis: a novel approach},
    volume = {58},
    issn = {1862-278X (Electronic) 0013-5585 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1515/bmt-2012-0036},
    abstract = {Clinical experience tells us that the lower-limb amputees are one of the patient groups who clearly suffer from a strength deficit in their involved side. However, there is no obvious evidence for the relation between the residual limb strength and walking ability in this population. Correlating the results of the conventional clinical gait analysis (CGA) with strength tests could help to find out how deficits in strength impact the amputees' gait. In this contribution, a new device for measuring the isometric muscle strength of the hip and the knee was tested for feasibility. Three groups were tested: one group of 11 healthy subjects (29+/-5 years) to test the repeatability of the device, two unilateral amputees (one transfemoral for 56 years, one transtibial for 65 years), and a reference group of 17 healthy subjects (55+/-10 years). The new method presents an adequate technique to integrate strength testing within a standard protocol of the CGA. Results showed to be repeatable within sessions [i.e., within-day, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC){\textgreater}0.972] and between repeated measurements (i.e., day-to-day, ICC{\textgreater}0.765). The tested amputees showed clear deficits in maximum isometric joint moments in their most distal joint. The first results suggest evidence for a relation between the maximum isometric joint moments and gait deviations in amputees.},
    journal = {Biomed Tech (Berl)},
    author = {Heitzmann, D. W. and Guenther, M. and Becher, B. and Alimusaj, M. and Block, J. and van Drongelen, S. and Dreher, T. and Braatz, F. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = apr,
    year = {2013},
    pages = {195--204},
    annote = {Heitzmann, Daniel W WGuenther, MichaelBecher, BenjaminAlimusaj, MerkurBlock, Juliavan Drongelen, StefanDreher, ThomasBraatz, FrankWolf, Sebastian IengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tGermany2013/03/05 06:00Biomed Tech (Berl). 2013 Apr;58(2):195-204. doi: 10.1515/bmt-2012-0036.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Clinics, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. daniel.heitzmann@med.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: Biomedizinische Technik. Biomedical engineeringnumber: 2accession-num: 23454713}
    }
  • [DOI] M. C. Klotz, L. Kost, F. Braatz, V. Ewerbeck, D. Heitzmann, S. Gantz, T. Dreher, and S. I. Wolf: „Motion capture of the upper extremity during activities of daily living in patients with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy,“ Gait posture, vol. 38, pp. 148-52, 2013.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{klotz_motion_2013,
    title = {Motion capture of the upper extremity during activities of daily living in patients with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy},
    volume = {38},
    issn = {1879-2219 (Electronic) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.11.005},
    abstract = {Investigations using motion capture to analyze limitations in range of motion (ROM) of the upper extremity in adults with cerebral palsy (CP) are scarce. To evaluate the influence of those limitations on activities of daily living (ADL) and to determine potential mechanisms of compensation, we investigated 15 adults with hemiplegic CP using motion capture while they performed 10 defined ADLs. Data from the nonaffected body side and those from an age-matched able-bodied group were also collected and compared with our subjects. We measured motion of the elbow, shoulder, and trunk and found significant differences in ROM at these sites. The most pronounced reduction in ROM was observed distally in supination and pronation of the elbow. Here, the affected body side of the adults showed a reduction in supination of 45 degrees compared to the able-bodied group. Furthermore we found a correlation between the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) and the limitations in ROM. In summary, adults with spastic, hemiplegic CP show limitations in ROM accentuated distally during ADLs. The MACS gives conclusive information about those limitations.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Klotz, M. C. and Kost, L. and Braatz, F. and Ewerbeck, V. and Heitzmann, D. and Gantz, S. and Dreher, T. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = may,
    year = {2013},
    pages = {148--52},
    annote = {Klotz, M C MKost, LBraatz, FEwerbeck, VHeitzmann, DGantz, SDreher, TWolf, S IengEngland2012/12/12 06:00Gait Posture. 2013 May;38(1):148-52. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.11.005. Epub 2012 Dec 4.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Clinics, Heidelberg, Germany. Matthias.klotz@med.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: Gait \& posturenumber: 1accession-num: 23218727}
    }
  • [DOI] M. C. Klotz, S. I. Wolf, D. Heitzmann, S. Gantz, F. Braatz, and T. Dreher: „The influence of botulinum toxin A injections into the calf muscles on genu recurvatum in children with cerebral palsy,“ Clin orthop relat res, vol. 471, pp. 2327-32, 2013.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{klotz_influence_2013,
    title = {The influence of botulinum toxin {A} injections into the calf muscles on genu recurvatum in children with cerebral palsy},
    volume = {471},
    issn = {1528-1132 (Electronic) 0009-921X (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1007/s11999-013-2897-7},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: With cerebral palsy (CP), an equinus deformity may lead to genu recurvatum. Botulinum toxin A (BtA) injection into the calf muscles is a well-accepted treatment for dynamic equinus deformity. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: The purpose of this study was to determine whether BtA injections into the calf muscles to decrease equinus would decrease coexisting genu recurvatum in children with diplegic CP. METHODS: In a retrospective study, 13 children (mean age, 5 years) with spastic diplegic CP showing equinus and coexisting primary genu recurvatum, who were treated with BtA injections into the calf muscles, were included. Evaluations were done before and 6 and 18 weeks after intervention using three-dimensional gait analysis and clinical examinations according to a standardized protocol. Basic statistical analyses (power analysis, ANOVA) were performed to compare genu recurvatum before treatment and at 6 and 18 weeks after injection with BtA. RESULTS: During stance phase, maximum ankle dorsiflexion was increased substantially from -3.0 degrees +/- 14.3 degrees before to 6.2 degrees +/- 14.2 degrees 6 weeks after the injections. Despite this, with the numbers available, the amount of recurvatum in stance did not improve with treatment at either 6 or 18 weeks. There was significant improvement of knee hyperextension during stance phase of 6.2 degrees between baseline and 18 weeks after BtA injection, but a genu recurvatum was still present in most patients. CONCLUSIONS: Despite improvement of ankle dorsiflexion after injection with BtA, genu recurvatum did not show relevant improvement at 6 or 18 weeks after injection with the numbers available. Because knee hyperextension remained in most patients, other factors leading to genu recurvatum should be taken into consideration. In addition, a botulinum toxin-induced weakness of the gastrocnemius may explain why recurvatum gait was not significantly reduced. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.},
    journal = {Clin Orthop Relat Res},
    author = {Klotz, M. C. and Wolf, S. I. and Heitzmann, D. and Gantz, S. and Braatz, F. and Dreher, T.},
    month = jul,
    year = {2013},
    keywords = {Ankle Joint/*drug effects/physiopathology, Biomechanics, Botulinum Toxins, Type A/*administration \& dosage, Cerebral Palsy/*complications, Child, Preschool, Equinus Deformity/*drug therapy/etiology/physiopathology, Female, Gait, Humans, Injections, Intramuscular, Joint Deformities, Acquired/*drug therapy/etiology/physiopathology, Knee Joint/*drug effects/physiopathology, Lower Extremity, Male, Muscle, Skeletal/*drug effects/physiopathology, Neuromuscular Agents/*administration \& dosage, Recovery of Function, Retrospective Studies, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome},
    pages = {2327--32},
    annote = {Klotz, Matthias C MWolf, Sebastian IHeitzmann, DanielGantz, SimoneBraatz, FrankDreher, Thomaseng2013/03/07 06:00Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2013 Jul;471(7):2327-32. doi: 10.1007/s11999-013-2897-7. Epub 2013 Mar 6.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Clinics, Heidelberg, Germany. Matthias.klotz@med.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: Clinical orthopaedics and related researchnumber: 7accession-num: 23463290}
    }
  • [DOI] M. C. Klotz, S. I. Wolf, D. Heitzmann, B. Krautwurst, F. Braatz, and T. Dreher: „Reduction in primary genu recurvatum gait after aponeurotic calf muscle lengthening during multilevel surgery,“ Res dev disabil, vol. 34, pp. 3773-3780, 2013.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{klotz_reduction_2013,
    title = {Reduction in primary genu recurvatum gait after aponeurotic calf muscle lengthening during multilevel surgery},
    volume = {34},
    issn = {1873-3379 (Electronic) 0891-4222 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.ridd.2013.08.019},
    abstract = {Knee hyperextension (genu recurvatum, GR) is often seen in children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Primary GR appears essential without previous treatment. As equinus deformity is suspected to be one of the main factors evoking primary GR, the purpose of this study was to determine whether lengthening the calf muscles to decrease equinus would decrease coexisting GR in children with bilateral spastic CP. In a retrospective study, 19 CP patients with primary GR (mean age: 9.4 years, 13 male, 6 female, 26 involved limbs) in whom an aponeurotic calf muscle lengthening procedure was performed during single-event multilevel surgery were included and investigated using three-dimensional gait analysis before and at a mean follow-up of 14 months after the procedure according to a standardized protocol. After calf muscle lengthening, a significant improvement in ankle dorsiflexion (9.5 degrees ) and a significant reduction (10.5 degrees ) in knee hyperextension (p{\textless}0.001) were found during mid-stance of the gait cycle. Six limbs (23\%) showed no improvement concerning knee hyperextension and were designated as nonresponders. In these patients no significant improvement in ankle dorsiflexion was found after surgery either. Improvement in ankle dorsiflexion and reduction in knee hyperextension in stance phase correlated significantly (r=0.46; p=0.019). These findings indicate that equinus deformity is a Major underlying factor in Primary GR and that calf muscle lengthening can effectively reduce GR in patients with CP.},
    journal = {Res Dev Disabil},
    author = {Klotz, M. C. and Wolf, S. I. and Heitzmann, D. and Krautwurst, B. and Braatz, F. and Dreher, T.},
    month = sep,
    year = {2013},
    pages = {3773--3780},
    annote = {Klotz, M C MWolf, S IHeitzmann, DKrautwurst, BBraatz, FDreher, TENG2013/09/14 06:00Res Dev Disabil. 2013 Sep 9;34(11):3773-3780. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2013.08.019.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: mcmklotz@gmx.net.alt-title: Research in developmental disabilitiesnumber: 11accession-num: 24029800}
    }
  • [DOI] B. K. Krautwurst, S. I. Wolf, D. W. Heitzmann, S. Gantz, F. Braatz, and T. Dreher: „The influence of hip abductor weakness on frontal plane motion of the trunk and pelvis in patients with cerebral palsy,“ Res dev disabil, vol. 34, pp. 1198-203, 2013.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{krautwurst_influence_2013,
    title = {The influence of hip abductor weakness on frontal plane motion of the trunk and pelvis in patients with cerebral palsy},
    volume = {34},
    issn = {1873-3379 (Electronic) 0891-4222 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.ridd.2012.12.018},
    abstract = {Trendelenburg walking pattern is a common finding in various disorders, including cerebral palsy (CP), where it is seen in children and adults. Clinically, this deviation is viewed as a consequence of hip abductor weakness resulting in pelvic obliquity. Trunk lean to the ipsilateral side is a common compensatory mechanism to counteract pelvic obliquity and to maintain gait stability. However, no published investigations objectively address pelvic and trunk motions in the frontal plane or examine the correlation with hip abductor weakness in patients with CP. We selected 375 ambulatory (GMFCS I-III) patients with spastic bilateral CP and 24 healthy controls from our gait laboratory database. They had all undergone a standardized three-dimensional analysis of gait, including trunk motion, and a clinical examination including hip abductor strength testing. Selected frontal plane kinematic and kinetic parameters were investigated and statistically tested for correlation (Spearman rank) with hip abductor strength. Only a weak (r=0.278) yet highly significant correlation between trunk lean and hip abductor strength was found. Hip abductor weakness was accompanied by decreased hip abduction moment. However, no significant differences in pelvic position were found between the different strength groups, indicating that the pelvis remained stable regardless of the patients' strength. Our findings indicate that weak hip abductors in patients with CP are accompanied by increased trunk lean to the ipsilateral side while pelvic position is preserved by this compensatory mechanism. However, since this correlation is weak, other factors influencing lateral trunk lean should be considered. In patients with severe weakness of the hip abductors compensatory trunk lean is no longer fully able to stabilize the pelvis, and frontal pelvic kinematics differs from normal during loading response. The results indicate that the stable pelvic position seems to be of greater importance than trunk position for patients with CP. Further studies are needed to investigate other factors influencing lateral trunk lean.},
    journal = {Res Dev Disabil},
    author = {Krautwurst, B. K. and Wolf, S. I. and Heitzmann, D. W. and Gantz, S. and Braatz, F. and Dreher, T.},
    month = apr,
    year = {2013},
    keywords = {*Torso, Adolescent, Adult, Biomechanics, Case-Control Studies, Cerebral Palsy/complications/*physiopathology, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Gait/*physiology, Hip Joint/physiopathology, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Movement/*physiology, Muscle, Skeletal/*physiopathology, Muscle Weakness/etiology/*physiopathology, Posture/*physiology, Thigh, Young Adult},
    pages = {1198--203},
    annote = {Krautwurst, Britta KWolf, Sebastian IHeitzmann, Daniel W WGantz, SimoneBraatz, FrankDreher, Thomaseng2013/02/12 06:00Res Dev Disabil. 2013 Apr;34(4):1198-203. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2012.12.018. Epub 2013 Feb 6.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Heidelberg University Clinics, Department for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 66118 Heidelberg, Germany.alt-title: Research in developmental disabilitiesnumber: 4accession-num: 23396196}
    }
  • [DOI] O. Rettig, M. W. Maier, S. Gantz, P. Raiss, F. Zeifang, and S. I. Wolf: „Does the reverse shoulder prosthesis medialize the center of rotation in the glenohumeral joint?,“ Gait posture, vol. 37, pp. 29-31, 2013.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{rettig_does_2013,
    title = {Does the reverse shoulder prosthesis medialize the center of rotation in the glenohumeral joint?},
    volume = {37},
    issn = {1879-2219 (Electronic) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.04.019},
    abstract = {Reverse shoulder arthroplasty is commonly used to improve the function of osteoarthritic shoulders in cases with irreparable refractory rotator cuff-tear arthropathy when conventional prosthesis designs cannot be applied. There is indication that moving the glenohumeral joint center more medially may lead to improved shoulder function by extending the lever arm for the deltoid muscle and facilitating muscle recruitment. However, there is little experimental evidence for this medialization effect. Marker based motion data of pre- and one year postoperative examinations on nine subjects who underwent reverse shoulder arthroplasty were analyzed applying functional methods for joint center estimation. The aim was to determine the location of the functional center of rotation in the operated and the non-operated contralateral side before and after surgery to verify if the joint center of this reverse prosthesis design is located more medially compared to the anatomic situation before surgery. It was shown that the operated shoulders demonstrated a medialization effect of 8.3+/-4.3mm. For the non-operated side the difference was 0.1+/-2.3mm, proving the accuracy of measurements.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Rettig, O. and Maier, M. W. and Gantz, S. and Raiss, P. and Zeifang, F. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = jan,
    year = {2013},
    keywords = {*Prosthesis Design, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Arthroplasty, Replacement/*methods, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Range of Motion, Articular, Recovery of Function, Retrospective Studies, Shoulder Joint/*surgery},
    pages = {29--31},
    annote = {Rettig, OliverMaier, Michael WGantz, SimoneRaiss, PatricZeifang, FelixWolf, Sebastian IengEngland2012/08/04 06:00Gait Posture. 2013 Jan;37(1):29-31. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.04.019. Epub 2012 Aug 2.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Clinic for Orthopedics and Traumatology, Heidelberg University Clinics, Germany.number: 1accession-num: 22858175}
    }
  • [DOI] S. van Drongelen, T. Dreher, D. W. Heitzmann, and S. I. Wolf: „Gait patterns in twins with cerebral palsy: similarities and development over time after multilevel surgery,“ Res dev disabil, vol. 34, pp. 1595-601, 2013.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{van_drongelen_gait_2013,
    title = {Gait patterns in twins with cerebral palsy: similarities and development over time after multilevel surgery},
    volume = {34},
    issn = {1873-3379 (Electronic) 0891-4222 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.ridd.2013.02.004},
    abstract = {To examine gait patterns and gait quality, 7 twins with cerebral palsy were measured preoperatively and after surgical intervention. The aim was to study differences and/or similarities in gait between twins, the influence of personal characteristics and birth conditions, and to describe the development of gait over time after single event multilevel surgery. A standardized clinical exam and a three-dimensional gait analysis were performed. Gait patterns were classified according to Sutherland and Davids, and the Gillette Gait Index was calculated as a global measure of the gait impairment. Next to subject characteristics at time of first measurement, and at time of birth, birth conditions were collected. Gait patterns were determined as crouch gait in 13 legs, as stiff gait in 6 legs and as jump gait in 8 legs. One leg showed a normal gait pattern. The knee flexion-extension angle correlated most constant with the knee flexion-extension angle of the contralateral leg (range 0.91-0.99). Correlations with the legs of the sibling showed variable correlations (range 0.44-0.99); with all other legs medium to high correlations of 0.73-0.91 were found. The Gillette Gait Index was found to initially decrease after surgical intervention. Similar correlations were found between twins or between legs for the gait pattern expressed by the knee flexion-extension angle, and the Gillette Gait Index improved after surgery. It seems that gait quality in twins with cerebral palsy is characterized predominantly by the traumatic disorder: genetic dispositions and personal characteristics only play a negligible role.},
    journal = {Res Dev Disabil},
    author = {van Drongelen, S. and Dreher, T. and Heitzmann, D. W. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = may,
    year = {2013},
    pages = {1595--601},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. stefan.vandrongelen@med.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: Research in developmental disabilitiesnumber: 5accession-num: 23475009},
    annote = {van Drongelen, StefanDreher, ThomasHeitzmann, Daniel W WWolf, Sebastian Ieng2013/03/12 06:00Res Dev Disabil. 2013 May;34(5):1595-601. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2013.02.004. Epub 2013 Mar 5.}
    }
  • [DOI] S. van Drongelen, S. I. Wolf, and L. Fradet: „Muscle load in reaching movements performed by a wheelchair user: a case study,“ Disabil rehabil, 2013.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{van_drongelen_muscle_2013,
    title = {Muscle load in reaching movements performed by a wheelchair user: a case study},
    issn = {1464-5165 (Electronic) 0963-8288 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.3109/09638288.2013.829527},
    abstract = {Abstract Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyse the load on the shoulder muscles during reaching movements that are specific to wheelchair users in relation to the risk of impingement. Method: Three activities of daily living were performed: putting a book on a shelf in front and at the side and putting a pack of water bottles on a table. The AnyBody shoulder model was used to calculate the activity and forces of the shoulder muscles. Results: Handling the pack of bottles caused the highest forces in the deltoideus, trapezius, serratus anterior and rotator cuff muscles. For handling the book, the highest forces were found in the deltoideus (scapular part) and the serratus anterior, especially during the put phase. Conclusions: Handling heavy objects such as a pack of bottles or a wheelchair produces high forces on the rotator cuff muscles and can lead to early fatigue. Therefore, these activities seem to be associated with a high risk of developing impingement syndrome. Implications for Rehabilitation In a single patient, this study demonstrates that the load on the rotator cuff is high during reaching movements. Handling a pack of water bottles, which resembles wheelchair handling, represents an activity associated with a high risk of developing impingement syndrome. Shoulder muscles must be trained in a balanced way to provide stabilization at the shoulder joint and prevent fatigue.},
    journal = {Disabil Rehabil},
    author = {van Drongelen, S. and Wolf, S. I. and Fradet, L.},
    month = sep,
    year = {2013},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital , Heidelberg , Germany and.alt-title: Disability and rehabilitationaccession-num: 23991678},
    annote = {van Drongelen, SWolf, S IFradet, LENG2013/09/03 06:00Disabil Rehabil. 2013 Sep 2.}
    }
  • [DOI] D. Vegvari, S. I. Wolf, D. Heitzmann, M. C. Klotz, and T. Dreher: „Does proximal rectus femoris release influence kinematics in patients with cerebral palsy and stiff knee gait?,“ Clin orthop relat res, vol. 471, pp. 3293-300, 2013.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{vegvari_does_2013,
    title = {Does proximal rectus femoris release influence kinematics in patients with cerebral palsy and stiff knee gait?},
    volume = {471},
    issn = {1528-1132 (Electronic) 0009-921X (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1007/s11999-013-3086-4},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: Stiff gait resulting from rectus femoris dysfunction in cerebral palsy commonly is treated by distal rectus femoris transfer (DRFT), but varying outcomes have been reported. Proximal rectus femoris release was found to be less effective compared with DRFT. No study to our knowledge has investigated the effects of the combination of both procedures on gait. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: We sought to determine whether an additional proximal rectus release affects knee and pelvic kinematics when done in combination with DRFT; specifically, we sought to compare outcomes using the (1) range of knee flexion in swing phase, (2) knee flexion velocity and (3) peak knee flexion in swing phase, and (4) spatiotemporal parameters between patients treated with DRFT, with or without proximal rectus release. Furthermore the effects on (5) anterior pelvic tilt in both groups were compared. METHODS: Twenty patients with spastic bilateral cerebral palsy treated with DRFT and proximal rectus femoris release were matched with 20 patients in whom only DRFT was performed. Standardized three-dimensional gait analysis was done before surgery, at 1 year after surgery, and at a mean of 9 years after surgery. Basic statistics were done to compare the outcome of both groups. RESULTS: The peak knee flexion in swing was slightly increased in both groups 1 year after surgery, but was not different between groups. Although there was a slight but not significant decrease found the group with DRFT only, there was no significant difference at long-term followup between the groups. Timing of peak knee flexion, range of knee flexion, and knee flexion velocity improved significantly in both groups, and in both groups a slight deterioration was seen with time; there were no differences in these parameters between the groups at any point, however. There were no group differences in spatiotemporal parameters at any time. There were no significant differences in the long-term development of anterior pelvic tilt between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: The results of our study indicate that the short- and long-term influences of adding proximal rectus femoris release on the kinematic effects of DRFT and on pelvic tilt in children with cerebral palsy are negligible. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.},
    journal = {Clin Orthop Relat Res},
    author = {Vegvari, D. and Wolf, S. I. and Heitzmann, D. and Klotz, M. C. and Dreher, T.},
    month = oct,
    year = {2013},
    pages = {3293--300},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedics, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.alt-title: Clinical orthopaedics and related researchnumber: 10accession-num: 23737262},
    annote = {Vegvari, DoraWolf, Sebastian IHeitzmann, DanielKlotz, Matthias C MDreher, Thomaseng2013/06/06 06:00Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2013 Oct;471(10):3293-300. doi: 10.1007/s11999-013-3086-4. Epub 2013 Jun 5.}
    }

2012

  • [DOI] T. Dreher, T. Buccoliero, S. I. Wolf, D. Heitzmann, S. Gantz, F. Braatz, and W. Wenz: „Long-term results after gastrocnemius-soleus intramuscular aponeurotic recession as a part of multilevel surgery in spastic diplegic cerebral palsy,“ J bone joint surg am, vol. 94, pp. 627-37, 2012.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{dreher_long-term_2012,
    title = {Long-term results after gastrocnemius-soleus intramuscular aponeurotic recession as a part of multilevel surgery in spastic diplegic cerebral palsy},
    volume = {94},
    issn = {1535-1386 (Electronic)},
    doi = {10.2106/JBJS.K.00096},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: Equinus of the foot at the ankle is one of the most common deformities in patients with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy, leading to gait disturbances and secondary deformities. During single-event multilevel surgery, equinus is commonly corrected by calf muscle lengthening, such as gastrocnemius-soleus intramuscular aponeurotic recession. Various studies have described satisfactory short-term results after gastrocnemius-soleus intramuscular aponeurotic recession. However, there is no evidence for maintenance of equinus correction because of the small and heterogeneous case series and short follow-up time previously reported. METHODS: The present study provides long-term results after gastrocnemius-soleus intramuscular aponeurotic recession as a part of multilevel surgery for the treatment of equinus in forty-four patients with spastic diplegia who were able to walk (forty-eight legs had lengthening of the gastrocnemius and thirty-four legs had lengthening of the gastrocnemius and soleus). Standardized three-dimensional gait analysis and clinical examination were done preoperatively and at one year, a mean (and standard deviation) of 3 +/- 1 years, and a mean of 9 +/- 2 years after surgery. RESULTS: Significant improvements in kinematic and kinetic ankle parameters on gait analysis as well as passive dorsiflexion in clinical examination were found one year after surgery. While there was a significant loss of passive dorsiflexion at the time of long-term follow-up, the improvements in gait analysis parameters were maintained. The endurance of gait improvements was accompanied by a persistent increase of dorsiflexor muscle strength without relevant loss of plantar flexor strength. Although it was not significant, there was a tendency for deterioration of gait analysis parameters over the nine years. The analysis of individual patterns showed recurrence of equinus at the ankle in 24\% of the legs. Early-onset calcaneal gait was found one year after surgery in seven legs (9\%), but without secondary crouch gait, and there was recovery at the time of the long-term follow-up. Late-onset calcaneal gait was seen at the time of long-term follow-up in eight legs (10\%), of which four had an accompanying crouch gait. CONCLUSIONS: Gastrocnemius-soleus intramuscular aponeurotic recession as a part of multilevel surgery leads to satisfactory correction of mild and moderate equinus deformity in children and adolescents with spastic diplegia without relevant risk for overcorrection and should be preferred over Achilles tendon lengthening to avoid overlengthening. The long-term results in the present study demonstrate that the improvements are long-lasting on average, but individual patients tend to develop recurrence and may need secondary gastrocnemius-soleus intramuscular aponeurotic recession.},
    journal = {J Bone Joint Surg Am},
    author = {Dreher, T. and Buccoliero, T. and Wolf, S. I. and Heitzmann, D. and Gantz, S. and Braatz, F. and Wenz, W.},
    month = apr,
    year = {2012},
    keywords = {Adolescent, Cerebral Palsy/*complications/diagnosis, Child, Cohort Studies, Combined Modality Therapy, Equinus Deformity/etiology/*surgery, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Foot Deformities, Acquired/etiology/surgery, Gait/*physiology, Germany, Humans, Kinetics, Male, Multivariate Analysis, Muscle, Skeletal/physiopathology/*surgery, Orthopedic Procedures/*methods, Postoperative Care/methods, Quality of Life, Range of Motion, Articular/physiology, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Severity of Illness Index, Statistics, Nonparametric, Tendons/surgery, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome},
    pages = {627--37},
    annote = {Dreher, ThomasBuccoliero, TanjaWolf, Sebastian IHeitzmann, DanielGantz, SimoneBraatz, FrankWenz, WolframengEvaluation Studies2012/04/11 06:00J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2012 Apr 4;94(7):627-37. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.K.00096.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Paediatric Orthopaedics and Foot Surgery, Heidelberg University Clinics, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. thomas.dreher@med.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volumenumber: 7accession-num: 22488619}
    }
  • [DOI] T. Dreher, M. Gotze, S. I. Wolf, S. Hagmann, D. Heitzmann, S. Gantz, and F. Braatz: „Distal rectus femoris transfer as part of multilevel surgery in children with spastic diplegia–a randomized clinical trial,“ Gait posture, vol. 36, pp. 212-8, 2012.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{dreher_distal_2012,
    title = {Distal rectus femoris transfer as part of multilevel surgery in children with spastic diplegia--a randomized clinical trial},
    volume = {36},
    issn = {1879-2219 (Electronic) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.02.017},
    abstract = {The evidence in support of distal rectus femoris transfer (DRFT) as part of single-event multilevel surgery (SEMLS) is limited due to inconsistent outcome reports and a lack of randomized studies. The purpose of this prospective randomized trial was to establish whether the results of SEMLS without DRFT are similar to those of a conventional approach that includes DRFT in the SEMLS. In all, 32 children with spastic diplegia (GMFCS I-III) and an indication for DRFT were recruited and randomized into a DRFT (15 children) and a NON-DRFT group (17 children) using a minimization method. During SEMLS, bilateral DRFT was performed only in the DRFT group. Three-dimensional gait analysis and clinical examination were performed before and 1 year after surgery. In both groups a significant increase in range of motion during swing and knee flexion velocity were found, which was significantly higher in the DRFT group. While peak knee flexion in swing (pKFSw) was preserved in the DRFT group and significantly decreased in the NON-DRFT group, pKFSw timing was significantly earlier in both groups. The clinical relevance of the higher overall benefits in the DRFT group is limited, considering that 33\% of patients in this group did not benefit from the procedure. Furthermore, 53\% of the NON-DRFT patients did not undergo what proved to be an unnecessary DRFT. Subgroup analysis showed benefits for patients with decreased pKFSw, while those with severe flexed-knee gait (normal or increased pKFSw) did not profit from DRFT. This may explain the inconsistent overall results, and DRFT is therefore not recommended as a "prophylactic" procedure in patients with severe flexed-knee gait.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Dreher, T. and Gotze, M. and Wolf, S. I. and Hagmann, S. and Heitzmann, D. and Gantz, S. and Braatz, F.},
    month = jun,
    year = {2012},
    keywords = {*Tendon Transfer, Adolescent, Biomechanics, Cerebral Palsy/complications/physiopathology/*surgery, Child, Female, Gait Disorders, Neurologic/complications/physiopathology/*surgery, Gait/physiology, Humans, Knee Joint/physiopathology, Male, Quadriceps Muscle/*surgery, Range of Motion, Articular, Reoperation, Walking},
    pages = {212--8},
    annote = {Dreher, ThomasGotze, MarcoWolf, Sebastian IHagmann, SebastienHeitzmann, DanielGantz, SimoneBraatz, FrankengRandomized Controlled TrialEngland2012/03/20 06:00Gait Posture. 2012 Jun;36(2):212-8. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.02.017. Epub 2012 Mar 15.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Paediatric Orthopaedics and Foot Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Clinics, Germany. thomas.dreher@med.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: Gait \& posturenumber: 2accession-num: 22425637}
    }
  • [DOI] T. Dreher, D. Vegvari, S. I. Wolf, A. Geisbusch, S. Gantz, W. Wenz, and F. Braatz: „Development of knee function after hamstring lengthening as a part of multilevel surgery in children with spastic diplegia: a long-term outcome study,“ J bone joint surg am, vol. 94, pp. 121-30, 2012.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{dreher_development_2012,
    title = {Development of knee function after hamstring lengthening as a part of multilevel surgery in children with spastic diplegia: a long-term outcome study},
    volume = {94},
    issn = {1535-1386 (Electronic) 0021-9355 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.2106/JBJS.J.00890},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: Hamstring lengthening commonly is performed for the treatment of flexed knee gait in patients with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. Satisfactory short-term results after hamstring lengthening have been demonstrated in various studies. However, evidence for the effectiveness of hamstring lengthening to correct flexed knee gait is scant because of small and inhomogeneous case series, different surgical techniques, and short follow-up. METHODS: The long-term results for thirty-nine patients with spastic diplegia and flexed knee gait who were managed with intramuscular hamstring lengthening as a part of multilevel surgery are presented. Standardized three-dimensional gait analyses and clinical examinations were performed for all patients preoperatively and at one, three, and six to twelve years postoperatively. RESULTS: Significant improvements in kinematic parameters and the popliteal angle were noted at short-term follow-up (p {\textless} 0.01), supporting the results of previous studies. Long-term results showed significant deterioration of minimum knee flexion in stance and the popliteal angle (p {\textless} 0.01), whereas the improvements in the Gross Motor Function Classification System and Gillette Gait Index were maintained. This recurrence of flexed knee gait is partial and measurable. Increased pelvic tilt was found in 49\% of the limbs postoperatively, which may represent one factor leading to recurrence of flexed knee gait. Genu recurvatum was seen in eighteen patients (twenty-seven limbs; 35\%) one year postoperatively, especially in the patients with a jump knee gait pattern preoperatively. At long-term follow-up, genu recurvatum resolved in many limbs, but 12\% of the limbs showed residual genu recurvatum, indicating that overcorrection represents a problem following hamstring lengthening. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study are crucial for the prognosis of knee function after hamstring lengthening as a part of multilevel surgery. Recurrence and possible overcorrection should be considered in treatment planning.},
    journal = {J Bone Joint Surg Am},
    author = {Dreher, T. and Vegvari, D. and Wolf, S. I. and Geisbusch, A. and Gantz, S. and Wenz, W. and Braatz, F.},
    month = jan,
    year = {2012},
    keywords = {Adolescent, Biomechanical Phenomena, Cerebral Palsy/complications/*surgery, Child, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Gait Disorders, Neurologic/complications/*surgery, Humans, Knee Joint/*physiology, Male, Muscle, Skeletal/*surgery, Range of Motion, Articular/physiology, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult},
    pages = {121--30},
    annote = {Dreher, ThomasVegvari, DoraWolf, Sebastian IGeisbusch, AndreasGantz, SimoneWenz, WolframBraatz, Frankeng2012/01/20 06:00J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2012 Jan 18;94(2):121-30. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.J.00890.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Clinics, Heidelberg, Germany. thomas.dreher@med.uni-heidelberg.denumber: 2accession-num: 22257998}
    }
  • [DOI] T. Dreher, S. I. Wolf, D. Heitzmann, B. Swartman, W. Schuster, S. Gantz, S. Hagmann, L. Doderlein, and F. Braatz: „Long-term outcome of femoral derotation osteotomy in children with spastic diplegia,“ Gait posture, vol. 36, pp. 467-70, 2012.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{dreher_long-term_2012-1,
    title = {Long-term outcome of femoral derotation osteotomy in children with spastic diplegia},
    volume = {36},
    issn = {1879-2219 (Electronic) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.04.017},
    abstract = {Satisfactory short-term results after femoral derotation osteotomy (FDO) for the treatment of internal rotation gait in cerebral palsy have been reported by various authors. However, there are only a few longer-term studies reporting results 5 years after FDO and these are not in agreement. There are no reports on the clinical course beyond the pubertal growth spurt. 33 children with diplegia (n=59 legs, age: 10.5+/-3.6 years) and internally rotated gait were examined pre- (E0), 1 year (E1), 3+/-1 (E2) and 9+/-2 (E3) years after distal (27 legs) or proximal (32 legs) FDO as part of multilevel surgery, using standardized clinical exam and 3D gait-analysis at all examinations. The amount of intra-operative derotation averaged 25 degrees . ANOVA was used for statistics (p{\textless}0.05). Mean hip internal rotation in stance at E0 of 17.3 degrees was significantly changed to 1.0 degrees of external rotation at E1 and was maintained at 4.2 degrees at E3. The same clinical course was found for foot progression angle. The mid-point of passive hip rotation at E0 was 21 degrees . This was significantly decreased to 6 degrees at E1 and showed a small but significant increase reaching 12 degrees at E3. The results of this study showed a good overall correction of internally rotated gait following FDO. These improvements were maintained at long-term follow-up after the pubertal growth spurt. Recurrence was observed in some cases with overall severe deterioration. In those patients persistent dynamic factors leading to recurrence should be further investigated.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Dreher, T. and Wolf, S. I. and Heitzmann, D. and Swartman, B. and Schuster, W. and Gantz, S. and Hagmann, S. and Doderlein, L. and Braatz, F.},
    month = jul,
    year = {2012},
    keywords = {Adolescent, Age Factors, Analysis of Variance, Biomechanics, Cerebral Palsy/complications/diagnosis/*surgery, Child, Cohort Studies, Databases, Factual, Female, Femur/*surgery, Follow-Up Studies, Gait Disorders, Neurologic/etiology/*physiopathology, Gait/*physiology, Hip Joint/physiology, Humans, Male, Osteotomy/*methods, Range of Motion, Articular/*physiology, Risk Assessment, Rotation, Sex Factors, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome},
    pages = {467--70},
    annote = {Dreher, ThomasWolf, Sebastian IHeitzmann, DanielSwartman, BenedictSchuster, WaltraudGantz, SimoneHagmann, SebastienDoderlein, LeonhardBraatz, FrankengEngland2012/07/07 06:00Gait Posture. 2012 Jul;36(3):467-70. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.04.017. Epub 2012 Jul 4.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Paediatric Orthopaedics and Foot Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Clinics, Germany. thomas.dreher@med.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: Gait \& posturenumber: 3accession-num: 22766044}
    }
  • [DOI] T. Dreher, S. I. Wolf, M. Maier, S. Hagmann, D. Vegvari, S. Gantz, D. Heitzmann, W. Wenz, and F. Braatz: „Long-term results after distal rectus femoris transfer as a part of multilevel surgery for the correction of stiff-knee gait in spastic diplegic cerebral palsy,“ J bone joint surg am, vol. 94, p. e142(1–10), 2012.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{dreher_long-term_2012-2,
    title = {Long-term results after distal rectus femoris transfer as a part of multilevel surgery for the correction of stiff-knee gait in spastic diplegic cerebral palsy},
    volume = {94},
    issn = {1535-1386 (Electronic)},
    doi = {10.2106/JBJS.K.01300},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: The evidence for distal rectus femoris transfer as a part of multilevel surgery for the correction of stiff-knee gait in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy is limited because of inconsistent outcomes reported in various studies and the lack of long-term evaluations. METHODS: This study investigated the long-term results (mean, nine years) for fifty-three ambulatory patients with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy and stiff-knee gait treated with standardized distal rectus femoris transfer as a part of multilevel surgery. Standardized three-dimensional gait analysis and clinical examination were carried out before surgery and at one year and nine years after surgery. Patients with decreased peak knee flexion in swing phase who had distal rectus femoris transfer to correct the decreased peak knee flexion in swing phase (C-DRFT) were evaluated separately from those with normal or increased peak knee flexion in swing phase who had distal rectus femoris transfer done as a prophylactic procedure (P-DRFT). RESULTS: A significantly increased peak knee flexion in swing phase was found in the C-DRFT group one year after surgery, while a significant loss (15 degrees ) in peak knee flexion in swing phase was noted in the P-DRFT group. A slight but not significant increase in peak knee flexion in swing phase in both groups was noted at the time of the long-term follow-up. A significant improvement in timing of peak knee flexion in swing phase was only found for the C-DRFT group, and was maintained after nine years. Knee motion and knee flexion velocity were significantly increased in both groups and were maintained at long-term follow-up in the C-DRFT group, while the P-DRFT showed a deterioration of knee motion. CONCLUSIONS: Distal rectus femoris transfer is an effective procedure to treat stiff-knee gait featuring decreased peak knee flexion in swing phase and leads to a long-lasting increase of peak knee flexion in swing phase nine years after surgery. Patients with more involvement showed a greater potential to benefit from distal rectus femoris transfer. However, 18\% of the patients showed a permanently poor response and 15\% developed recurrence. In patients with severe knee flexion who underwent a prophylactic distal rectus femoris transfer, a significant loss in peak knee flexion in swing phase was noted and thus a prophylactic distal rectus femoris transfer may not be indicated in these patients. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.},
    journal = {J Bone Joint Surg Am},
    author = {Dreher, T. and Wolf, S. I. and Maier, M. and Hagmann, S. and Vegvari, D. and Gantz, S. and Heitzmann, D. and Wenz, W. and Braatz, F.},
    month = oct,
    year = {2012},
    keywords = {Adolescent, Cerebral Palsy/complications/diagnosis/*surgery, Child, Cohort Studies, Disability Evaluation, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Gait Disorders, Neurologic/etiology/*surgery, Gait/physiology, Humans, Knee Joint/physiopathology/*surgery, Male, Postoperative Care/methods, Prospective Studies, Quadriceps Muscle/surgery/*transplantation, Range of Motion, Articular/*physiology, Recovery of Function, Recurrence, Risk Assessment, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome},
    pages = {e142(1--10)},
    annote = {Dreher, ThomasWolf, Sebastian IMaier, MichaelHagmann, SebastienVegvari, DoraGantz, SimoneHeitzmann, DanielWenz, WolframBraatz, FrankengEvaluation Studies2012/10/04 06:00J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2012 Oct 3;94(19):e142(1-10). doi: 10.2106/JBJS.K.01300.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Paediatric Orthopaedics and Foot Surgery, Department for Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Clinics, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. thomas.dreher@med.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volumenumber: 19accession-num: 23032593}
    }
  • [DOI] M. Grun, T. Meiss, R. Muller, J. Block, D. Heitzmann, S. V. Drongelen, M. Vanoncini, S. I. Wolf, P. Pott, H. F. Schlaak, R. Werthschutzky, and U. Konigorski: „Active Knee Orthosis for Supporting the Elderly,“ Biomed tech (berl), 2012.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{grun_active_2012,
    title = {Active {Knee} {Orthosis} for {Supporting} the {Elderly}},
    issn = {1862-278X (Electronic) 0013-5585 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1515/bmt-2012-4183},
    journal = {Biomed Tech (Berl)},
    author = {Grun, M. and Meiss, T. and Muller, R. and Block, J. and Heitzmann, D. and Drongelen, S. V. and Vanoncini, M. and Wolf, S. I. and Pott, P. and Schlaak, H. F. and Werthschutzky, R. and Konigorski, U.},
    month = sep,
    year = {2012},
    annote = {Grun, MMeiss, TMuller, RBlock, JHeitzmann, DDrongelen, S vanVanoncini, MWolf, S IPott, PSchlaak, H FWerthschutzky, RKonigorski, UENG2012/09/11 06:00Biomed Tech (Berl). 2012 Sep 6. pii: /j/bmte.2012.57.issue-s1-R/bmt-2012-4183/bmt-2012-4183.xml. doi: 10.1515/bmt-2012-4183.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:alt-title: Biomedizinische Technik. Biomedical engineeringaccession-num: 22962125}
    }
  • [DOI] M. W. Maier, M. Niklasch, T. Dreher, S. I. Wolf, F. Zeifang, M. Loew, and P. Kasten: „Proprioception 3 years after shoulder arthroplasty in 3d motion analysis: a prospective study,“ Arch orthop trauma surg, vol. 132, pp. 1003-10, 2012.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{maier_proprioception_2012,
    title = {Proprioception 3 years after shoulder arthroplasty in 3D motion analysis: a prospective study},
    volume = {132},
    issn = {1434-3916 (Electronic) 0936-8051 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1007/s00402-012-1495-6},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: This prospective study evaluated the development of proprioception over the course of 3 years after shoulder arthroplasty. METHODS: Twenty-one patients were enrolled who underwent total shoulder arthroplasty (n = 10) or hemiarthroplasty (HEMI) (n = 11) for shoulder osteoarthritis. All patients were examined 1 day before the operation, 6 months and 3 years after surgery in a motion analysis study with an active angle-reproduction (AAR) test. RESULTS: Overall proprioception measured by the AAR deteriorated significantly 3 years after surgery [from 6.6 degrees (SD 3.1) to 10.3 degrees (SD 5.7); p = 0.017] and was significantly worse than in the control group [10.3 degrees (SD 5.7) vs. 7.8 degrees (SD 2.3); p = 0.030). In the HEMI subgroup, 3 years after shoulder replacement, there is a significant deterioration of proprioception at 30 degrees of external rotation [from 3.1 degrees (SD 3.5) to 12.8 degrees (SD 10.7); p = 0.031]. On average, in the TSA subgroup proprioception deteriorated from 7.1 degrees (SD 3.1) to 8.6 degrees (SD 1.4) and in the HEMI subgroup from 6.1 degrees (SD 2.1) to 12.4 degrees (SD 8.3). The comparison of postoperative impairment of proprioception between the TSA and HEMI subgroup showed significantly worse proprioception for the HEMI subgroup at 30 degrees of external rotation [9.8 degrees (SD 10.1) vs. 1.6 degrees (SD 6.3) in the TSA group; p = 0.046]. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, proprioception that was measured by an AAR test remained unchanged or deteriorated 3 years after shoulder arthroplasty. The postoperative deterioration of proprioception was more distinctive in HEMI than in TSA group.},
    journal = {Arch Orthop Trauma Surg},
    author = {Maier, M. W. and Niklasch, M. and Dreher, T. and Wolf, S. I. and Zeifang, F. and Loew, M. and Kasten, P.},
    month = jul,
    year = {2012},
    keywords = {*Proprioception, Aged, Arthroplasty, Replacement/*rehabilitation, Case-Control Studies, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Osteoarthritis/rehabilitation/*surgery, Prospective Studies, Recovery of Function, Shoulder Joint/*physiopathology/surgery, Treatment Outcome},
    pages = {1003--10},
    annote = {Maier, Michael WNiklasch, MirjamDreher, ThomasWolf, Sebastian IZeifang, FelixLoew, MarkusKasten, PhilipengClinical TrialResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tGermany2012/03/10 06:00Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2012 Jul;132(7):1003-10. doi: 10.1007/s00402-012-1495-6. Epub 2012 Mar 9.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Paraplegiology, University of Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, Heidelberg, Germany. michael.maier@med.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: Archives of orthopaedic and trauma surgerynumber: 7accession-num: 22402768}
    }
  • [DOI] K. Sander, D. Rosenbaum, H. Bohm, F. Layher, T. Lindner, R. Wegener, S. I. Wolf, and F. Seehaus: „Instrumented gait and movement analysis of musculoskeletal diseases,“ Orthopade, vol. 41, pp. 802-19, 2012.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{sander_instrumented_2012,
    title = {Instrumented gait and movement analysis of musculoskeletal diseases},
    volume = {41},
    issn = {1433-0431 (Electronic) 0085-4530 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1007/s00132-012-1947-2},
    abstract = {Instrumented 3-dimensional gait analysis is increasingly being used for the evaluation of movement disorders in orthopedic and neurological musculoskeletal diseases. Due to the high reliability of the measurements the procedures are appropriate for diagnostic purposes as well as for outcome assessment after conservative or surgical interventions. Contrary to conventional clinical assessments gait analysis parameters are able to demonstrate a normal physiological gait pattern that can be achieved with improved kinematic and kinetic parameters. For a suitable application in clinically relevant problems the limitations of the procedures should be taken into account. Due to the high instrumental involvement combined with time and cost expenditure instrumented gait analysis will probably not develop to a clinical routine procedure. Nevertheless, an excellent set of information for answering clinical questions is provided. The present contribution presents selected measurement procedures and technologies and illustrates the wide variety of possibilities with the use of selected clinical examples.},
    journal = {Orthopade},
    author = {Sander, K. and Rosenbaum, D. and Bohm, H. and Layher, F. and Lindner, T. and Wegener, R. and Wolf, S. I. and Seehaus, F.},
    month = oct,
    year = {2012},
    keywords = {Actigraphy/*instrumentation, Equipment Design, Gait Disorders, Neurologic/*diagnosis/*physiopathology, Humans, Monitoring, Ambulatory/*instrumentation, Musculoskeletal Diseases/*diagnosis/*physiopathology},
    pages = {802--19},
    annote = {Sander, KRosenbaum, DBohm, HLayher, FLindner, TWegener, RWolf, S ISeehaus, FgerEnglish AbstractGermany2012/10/12 06:00Orthopade. 2012 Oct;41(10):802-19. doi: 10.1007/s00132-012-1947-2.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Abt. Biomechanik, Lehrstuhl fur Orthopadie des Universitatsklinikums Jena, Waldkrankenhaus Rudolf Elle GmbH, Klosterlausnitzer Str. 81, 07607, Eisenberg, Deutschland. k.sander@krankenhaus-eisenberg.dealt-title: Der Orthopadenumber: 10orig-pub: Instrumentelle Gang- und Bewegungsanalyse bei muskuloskelettalen Erkrankungen.accession-num: 23052847}
    }
  • [DOI] S. I. Wolf, J. Block, S. V. Drongelen, D. Heitzmann, R. Muller, and M. Grun: „Power support by an active knee orthosis during sit to stand,“ Biomed tech (berl), 2012.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{wolf_power_2012,
    title = {Power support by an active knee orthosis during sit to stand},
    issn = {1862-278X (Electronic) 0013-5585 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1515/bmt-2012-4239},
    journal = {Biomed Tech (Berl)},
    author = {Wolf, S. I. and Block, J. and Drongelen, S. V. and Heitzmann, D. and Muller, R. and Grun, M.},
    month = sep,
    year = {2012},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:alt-title: Biomedizinische Technik. Biomedical engineeringaccession-num: 22962119},
    annote = {Wolf, S IBlock, JDrongelen, S vanHeitzmann, DMuller, RGrun, MENG2012/09/11 06:00Biomed Tech (Berl). 2012 Sep 6. pii: /j/bmte.2012.57.issue-s1-R/bmt-2012-4239/bmt-2012-4239.xml. doi: 10.1515/bmt-2012-4239.}
    }

2011

  • [DOI] L. Fradet, J. Tiernan, M. McGrath, E. Murray, F. Braatz, and S. I. Wolf: „The use of pressure mapping for seating posture characterisation in children with cerebral palsy,“ Disabil rehabil assist technol, vol. 6, pp. 47-56, 2011.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{fradet_use_2011,
    title = {The use of pressure mapping for seating posture characterisation in children with cerebral palsy},
    volume = {6},
    issn = {1748-3115 (Electronic) 1748-3107 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.3109/17483107.2010.512969},
    abstract = {PURPOSE: To investigate the feasibility of using pressure mapping for the characterisation of the seated posture of children with cerebral palsy (CP). METHOD: Analysis of pressure mapping readings and video of children seated in a seating system during two assessments: The first assessment involved the pressure mapping of non-disabled children during a standardised protocol, and the second one involved the pressure mapping of children with CP performing daily life activities. RESULTS: It was possible to detect periods of activity of the children from pressure readings using the mean variation of pressure. Additionally, several parameters stemming from pressure readings were shown to be successful in assessing the posture of the children. The centre of pressure when positioned relative to the ischial tuberosities, allowed for recognition of 'adverse postures' involving pelvic obliquity/medio-lateral trunk flexion or antero-posterior pelvic tilt/ trunk flexion-extension, as deviations from the centre point. The angle between the principal axis of the sensors' pressure and the medio-lateral axis of the seat was also proposed to characterise pelvic transverse rotation but could not be tested with the actual protocol. CONCLUSIONS: Pressure monitoring can be used to assess qualitatively and quantitatively sitting posture of children with CP.},
    journal = {Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol},
    author = {Fradet, L. and Tiernan, J. and McGrath, M. and Murray, E. and Braatz, F. and Wolf, S. I.},
    year = {2011},
    keywords = {*Physical Therapy Modalities, Adolescent, Biomechanics, Cerebral Palsy/*rehabilitation, Child, Female, Humans, Male, Movement, Posture},
    pages = {47--56},
    annote = {Fradet, LaetitiaTiernan, JohnMcGrath, MargaretMurray, ElaineBraatz, FranckWolf, Sebastian IengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEngland2010/09/03 06:00Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2011;6(1):47-56. doi: 10.3109/17483107.2010.512969.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedics, University of Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, Heidelberg, Germany. lfradet@yahoo.fralt-title: Disability and rehabilitation. Assistive technologynumber: 1accession-num: 20807183}
    }
  • [DOI] S. I. Wolf, F. Braatz, D. Metaxiotis, P. Armbrust, T. Dreher, L. Doderlein, and R. Mikut: „Gait analysis may help to distinguish hereditary spastic paraplegia from cerebral palsy,“ Gait posture, vol. 33, pp. 556-61, 2011.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{wolf_gait_2011,
    title = {Gait analysis may help to distinguish hereditary spastic paraplegia from cerebral palsy},
    volume = {33},
    issn = {1879-2219 (Electronic) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2011.01.009},
    abstract = {Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) designates a group of genetic disorders typically leading to spasticity in the lower limbs and consequently to gait disorders. Although the symptoms are similar to those of cerebral palsy (CP), the correct diagnosis is important for treatment recommendations as one condition is progressive in nature whereas the other is not. Due to the heterogeneity of HSP, genetic testing is complex and in some genetic forms still not possible. The aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate if instrumented 3D-gait analysis could help distinguish between these two conditions. The gait pattern of 29 patients with HSP was compared with that of 29 patients with CP who were matched in age, sex, and the extent of gait disturbance and also to 29 typically developing subjects for reference. More than 3000 gait parameters were evaluated for their relevance to classify patients into diagnostic groups. Cluster analysis revealed that these gait features may classify only subgroups of symptoms as the gait pattern is very heterogeneous within each diagnosis group. However, prolonged hip extension, knee extension, and ankle plantar flexion were identified as indicators for HSP. In addition, large trunk tilt velocities appear unique in some cases of HSP. These indicators in gait pattern may contribute in establishing the diagnosis of HSP, which is important in predicting outcome when planning surgical treatment for functional improvements in these patients.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Wolf, S. I. and Braatz, F. and Metaxiotis, D. and Armbrust, P. and Dreher, T. and Doderlein, L. and Mikut, R.},
    month = apr,
    year = {2011},
    keywords = {*Gait, Adolescent, Adult, Biomechanics, Cerebral Palsy/*diagnosis, Child, Child, Preschool, Diagnosis, Differential, Female, Humans, Lower Extremity/physiopathology, Male, Middle Aged, Spastic Paraplegia, Hereditary/*diagnosis, Young Adult},
    pages = {556--61},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. sebastian.wolf@med.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: Gait \& posturenumber: 4accession-num: 21330136},
    annote = {Wolf, Sebastian IBraatz, FrankMetaxiotis, DimitriosArmbrust, PetraDreher, ThomasDoderlein, LeonhardMikut, RalfengEngland2011/02/19 06:00Gait Posture. 2011 Apr;33(4):556-61. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2011.01.009. Epub 2011 Feb 16.}
    }

2010

  • [DOI] L. Fradet, M. Alimusaj, F. Braatz, and S. I. Wolf: „Biomechanical analysis of ramp ambulation of transtibial amputees with an adaptive ankle foot system,“ Gait posture, vol. 32, pp. 191-8, 2010.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{fradet_biomechanical_2010,
    title = {Biomechanical analysis of ramp ambulation of transtibial amputees with an adaptive ankle foot system},
    volume = {32},
    issn = {1879-2219 (Electronic) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2010.04.011},
    abstract = {The fixed neutral position of conventional prosthetic feet causes difficulties for transtibial amputees (TTAs) when walking on ramps. New microprocessor-controlled prosthetic ankles such as the Proprio-Foot (Ossur) aim to reduce these difficulties by modifying the prosthetic ankle angle according to the gait condition. The purpose of the present investigation was to assess the biomechanical effects of adaptation of the prosthetic ankle on ramp ambulation in TTAs. Sixteen TTAs and 16 controls underwent a conventional 3D gait analysis while walking up and down a ramp. TTAs walked with the prosthetic foot set to a neutral mode angle and set to the adapted mode. Norm distance, sagittal kinematics and kinetics were calculated for comparisons between TTAs and controls. During ramp ascent, the dorsiflexion brought about by the adapted prosthetic ankle reduced the increased knee extension noted on the TTAs' involved side and the increased plantarflexion on their sound side. During ramp descent, the plantarflexion of the adapted mode increased the adaptation mechanisms observed in TTAs. These findings suggest that the adapted mode leads to more physiologic kinematics and kinetics in the lower limbs in TTAs during ramp ascent but not during ramp descent. However, in the adapted mode, patients reported feeling safer during ramp descent, thus indicating that there might be other safety related measures such as toe-clearance or coefficient of friction influencing this perception.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Fradet, L. and Alimusaj, M. and Braatz, F. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = jun,
    year = {2010},
    keywords = {*Amputees, *Artificial Limbs, Adult, Biomechanics, Case-Control Studies, Female, Gait/*physiology, Humans, Leg/*physiology/surgery, Male, Middle Aged, Weight-Bearing/physiology},
    pages = {191--8},
    annote = {Fradet, LaetitiaAlimusaj, MerkurBraatz, FrankWolf, Sebastian IengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEngland2010/05/12 06:00Gait Posture. 2010 Jun;32(2):191-8. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2010.04.011. Epub 2010 May 8.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200 a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany.alt-title: Gait \& posturenumber: 2accession-num: 20457526}
    }
  • [DOI] D. Twomey, A. S. McIntosh, J. Simon, K. Lowe, and S. I. Wolf: „Kinematic differences between normal and low arched feet in children using the Heidelberg foot measurement method,“ Gait posture, vol. 32, pp. 1-5, 2010.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{twomey_kinematic_2010,
    title = {Kinematic differences between normal and low arched feet in children using the {Heidelberg} foot measurement method},
    volume = {32},
    issn = {1879-2219 (Electronic) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2010.01.021},
    abstract = {The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinematics of normal arched and low arched feet in children and use this data to quantify the differences between the two foot types during walking gait. Multi-segment foot motion was measured, using the Heidelberg foot measurement method (HFMM), for 25 normal arched feet and 27 low arched feet in 9-12-year-old children. The kinematic differences in the foot between the two groups during walking were relatively small, except for the medial arch and forefoot supination angles. The magnitude of the medial arch angle was approximately 10 degrees greater in the low arched group than the normal arched group throughout the gait cycle. There was a significant difference found in the forefoot supination angle (p{\textless}0.03), relative to the midfoot, between the two groups at initial heel strike, and maximum and minimum values throughout the gait cycle. The values for the normal group were significantly higher in all these angles indicating that the forefoot of the low arched foot remains less pronated during the gait cycle. There was no significant difference in the motion of the rearfoot between the two foot types. The results of this study provide normative values for children's feet and highlight the mechanical differences in flexible flat feet in this age group. This data contributes to knowledge on foot kinematics in children and will be valuable for future research on the structure, function and potential treatment of the flexible flat foot.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Twomey, D. and McIntosh, A. S. and Simon, J. and Lowe, K. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = may,
    year = {2010},
    keywords = {Biomechanics, Child, Female, Foot Deformities, Congenital/*physiopathology, Foot/*physiology, Gait/physiology, Hallux/physiology, Humans, Male, Range of Motion, Articular/physiology, Subtalar Joint/physiology, Supination/physiology, Video Recording, Walking/*physiology},
    pages = {1--5},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: School of Safety Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia.alt-title: Gait \& posturenumber: 1accession-num: 20172730},
    annote = {Twomey, DMcIntosh, A SSimon, JLowe, KWolf, S IengComparative StudyEngland2010/02/23 06:00Gait Posture. 2010 May;32(1):1-5. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2010.01.021. Epub 2010 Feb 21.}
    }

2009

  • [DOI] M. Alimusaj, L. Fradet, F. Braatz, H. J. Gerner, and S. I. Wolf: „Kinematics and kinetics with an adaptive ankle foot system during stair ambulation of transtibial amputees,“ Gait posture, vol. 30, pp. 356-63, 2009.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{alimusaj_kinematics_2009,
    title = {Kinematics and kinetics with an adaptive ankle foot system during stair ambulation of transtibial amputees},
    volume = {30},
    issn = {1879-2219 (Electronic) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2009.06.009},
    abstract = {Conventional prosthetic feet cannot adapt to specific conditions such as walking on stairs or ramps. Amputees are therefore forced to compensate their prosthetic deficits by modifying the kinematics and kinetics of their lower limbs. The Proprio-Foot (Ossur) intends to reduce these compensation mechanisms by automatically increasing dorsiflexion during stair ambulation thanks to an adaptive microprocessor-controlled ankle. The present investigation proposes to analyze the biomechanical effects of the dorsiflexion adaptation in transtibial (TT) amputees during stair ambulation. Sixteen TT amputees and sixteen healthy controls underwent conventional 3D gait analysis. Kinematics and kinetics of the lower limbs were compared during stair ascent and descent performed by patients with the prosthetic foot set to a neutral ankle angle and with an adapted dorsiflexion ankle angle of 4 degrees . Norm distance as well as minimum and maximal values of sagittal kinematics and kinetics were calculated for comparisons between patients and control subjects. For both stair ascent and descent, an improvement of the knee kinematics and kinetics could particularly be noticed on the involved side with an increase of the knee flexion and an increase of the knee moment during stance. Therefore, despite its additional weight compared to a conventional prosthetic ankle, the Proprio-Foot should be beneficial to active TT amputees whose knee musculature strength does not constitute a handicap.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Alimusaj, M. and Fradet, L. and Braatz, F. and Gerner, H. J. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = oct,
    year = {2009},
    keywords = {*Activities of Daily Living, *Amputees, *Artificial Limbs, *Leg, Adult, Biomechanics, Case-Control Studies, Female, Humans, Kinesis, Male, Muscle, Skeletal/physiology, Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted, Walking/*physiology, Weight-Bearing/physiology},
    pages = {356--63},
    annote = {Alimusaj, MerkurFradet, LaetitiaBraatz, FrankGerner, Hans JWolf, Sebastian IengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEngland2009/07/21 09:00Gait Posture. 2009 Oct;30(3):356-63. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2009.06.009. Epub 2009 Jul 17.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. merkur.alimusaj@ok.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: Gait \& posturenumber: 3accession-num: 19616436}
    }
  • [DOI] L. Fradet, J. Siegel, M. Dahl, M. Alimusaj, and S. I. Wolf: „Spatial synchronization of an insole pressure distribution system with a 3d motion analysis system for center of pressure measurements,“ Med biol eng comput, vol. 47, pp. 85-92, 2009.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{fradet_spatial_2009,
    title = {Spatial synchronization of an insole pressure distribution system with a 3D motion analysis system for center of pressure measurements},
    volume = {47},
    issn = {1741-0444 (Electronic) 0140-0118 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1007/s11517-008-0382-3},
    abstract = {Insole pressure systems are often more appropriate than force platforms for analysing center of pressure (CoP) as they are more flexible in use and indicate the position of the CoP that characterizes the contact foot/shoe during gait with shoes. However, these systems are typically not synchronized with 3D motion analysis systems. The present paper proposes a direct method that does not require a force platform for synchronizing an insole pressure system with a 3D motion analysis system. The distance separating 24 different CoPs measured optically and their equivalents measured by the insoles and transformed in the global coordinate system did not exceed 2 mm, confirming the suitability of the method proposed. Additionally, during static single limb stance, distances smaller than 7 mm and correlations higher than 0.94 were found between CoP trajectories measured with insoles and force platforms. Similar measurements were performed during gait to illustrate the characteristics of the CoP measured with each system. The distance separating the two CoPs was below 19 mm and the coefficient of correlation above 0.86. The proposed method offers the possibility to conduct new experiments, such as the investigation of proprioception in climbing stairs or in the presence of obstacles.},
    journal = {Med Biol Eng Comput},
    author = {Fradet, L. and Siegel, J. and Dahl, M. and Alimusaj, M. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = jan,
    year = {2009},
    keywords = {*Motion, *Shoes, Artificial Limbs, Foot/*physiology, Gait/*physiology, Humans, Orthotic Devices, Pressure, Proprioception/physiology, Prosthesis Design, Weight-Bearing/physiology},
    pages = {85--92},
    annote = {Fradet, LaetitiaSiegel, JohannesDahl, MariekeAlimusaj, MerkurWolf, Sebastian IengValidation Studies2008/08/30 09:00Med Biol Eng Comput. 2009 Jan;47(1):85-92. doi: 10.1007/s11517-008-0382-3. Epub 2008 Aug 26.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Heidelberg Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. laetitia.fradet@ok.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: Medical \& biological engineering \& computingnumber: 1accession-num: 18726629}
    }
  • [DOI] P. Kasten, M. Maier, O. Rettig, P. Raiss, S. Wolf, and M. Loew: „Proprioception in total, hemi- and reverse shoulder arthroplasty in 3d motion analyses: a prospective study,“ Int orthop, vol. 33, pp. 1641-7, 2009.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{kasten_proprioception_2009,
    title = {Proprioception in total, hemi- and reverse shoulder arthroplasty in 3D motion analyses: a prospective study},
    volume = {33},
    issn = {1432-5195 (Electronic) 0341-2695 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1007/s00264-008-0666-0},
    abstract = {The aim of the study was to assess proprioception after shoulder arthroplasty. Twenty-six patients were enrolled who underwent total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) (n = 13) or hemi-arthroplasty (n = 8) for shoulder osteoarthritis or reversed arthroplasty (n = 5) for cuff tear arthropathy. All patients were examined before the operation and then again six months thereafter in a motion analysis study with an active angle-reproduction (AAR) test. In all groups the AAR deteriorated at 60 degrees flexion (from 5.5 degrees [SD 2.8] to 7.6 degrees [SD 2.7]; p = 0.007) and at 30 degrees external rotation (ER) (from 6.5 degrees [SD 3.6] to 7.3 degrees [SD 4.8 degrees]; p = 0.023) six months after surgery. In the subgroup of TSA, there was deterioration at 30 degrees ER (p = 0.036). Otherwise, there were no significant changes within or among the subgroups. Proprioception, assessed by the AAR test, remained unchanged or deteriorated six months after shoulder arthroplasty. This might be related to the reduced pain or to the relatively short follow-up period.},
    journal = {Int Orthop},
    author = {Kasten, P. and Maier, M. and Rettig, O. and Raiss, P. and Wolf, S. and Loew, M.},
    month = dec,
    year = {2009},
    keywords = {Aged, Arthralgia/physiopathology, Arthroplasty, Replacement/*methods/rehabilitation, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional/*methods, Joint Prosthesis, Male, Middle Aged, Osteoarthritis/rehabilitation/surgery, Proprioception/*physiology, Prospective Studies, Range of Motion, Articular/*physiology, Rotator Cuff/injuries/surgery, Shoulder Joint/*physiology/*surgery, Time Factors},
    pages = {1641--7},
    annote = {Kasten, PhilipMaier, MichaelRettig, OliverRaiss, PatricWolf, SebastianLoew, MarkusengGermany2008/10/29 09:00Int Orthop. 2009 Dec;33(6):1641-7. doi: 10.1007/s00264-008-0666-0. Epub 2008 Oct 28.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200a, 69118, Heidelberg, Germany. Philip.Kasten@gmx.dealt-title: International orthopaedicsnumber: 6accession-num: 18956186}
    }
  • [DOI] P. Kasten, O. Rettig, M. Loew, S. Wolf, and P. Raiss: „Three-dimensional motion analysis of compensatory movements in patients with radioulnar synostosis performing activities of daily living,“ J orthop sci, vol. 14, pp. 307-12, 2009.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{kasten_three-dimensional_2009,
    title = {Three-dimensional motion analysis of compensatory movements in patients with radioulnar synostosis performing activities of daily living},
    volume = {14},
    issn = {1436-2023 (Electronic) 0949-2658 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1007/s00776-009-1332-0},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to quantify the compensatory movements of the shoulder and elbow in patients with congenital radioulnar synostosis during 10 activities of daily living (ADL). METHODS: Maximum and minimum joint angles and range of motion were measured by use of a motion capture system in seven patients and seven matched controls. The forearm was fixed in 0 degrees of rotation in four patients and in 20 degrees of pronation in three patients. RESULTS: The main compensatory movements were shoulder internal/external rotation during five ADL tasks, shoulder abduction/adduction and elbow flexion/extension during three tasks, and shoulder flexion/extension during two tasks. These compensatory movements were observed mainly when turning a key and drawing. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with congenital radioulnar synostosis in nearly neutral rotation could perform all ADL tasks with the aid of compensatory movements of the shoulder and elbow.},
    journal = {J Orthop Sci},
    author = {Kasten, P. and Rettig, O. and Loew, M. and Wolf, S. and Raiss, P.},
    month = may,
    year = {2009},
    keywords = {*Activities of Daily Living, Adolescent, Adult, Arthrometry, Articular, Case-Control Studies, Elbow Joint/*physiopathology, Humans, Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted, Middle Aged, Range of Motion, Articular/*physiology, Shoulder Joint/*physiopathology, Synostosis/*physiopathology, Task Performance and Analysis, Video Recording, Young Adult},
    pages = {307--12},
    annote = {Kasten, PhilipRettig, OliverLoew, MarkusWolf, SebastianRaiss, PatricengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tJapan2009/06/06 09:00J Orthop Sci. 2009 May;14(3):307-12. doi: 10.1007/s00776-009-1332-0. Epub 2009 Jun 5.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, Orthopaedic University Hospital of Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200 A, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany.alt-title: Journal of orthopaedic science : official journal of the Japanese Orthopaedic Associationnumber: 3accession-num: 19499298}
    }
  • [DOI] O. Rettig, L. Fradet, P. Kasten, P. Raiss, and S. I. Wolf: „A new kinematic model of the upper extremity based on functional joint parameter determination for shoulder and elbow,“ Gait posture, vol. 30, pp. 469-76, 2009.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{rettig_new_2009,
    title = {A new kinematic model of the upper extremity based on functional joint parameter determination for shoulder and elbow},
    volume = {30},
    issn = {1879-2219 (Electronic) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2009.07.111},
    abstract = {A new upper extremity model is introduced for clinical application. It combines the advantages of functional methods to determine the joint parameters for the shoulder joint centre and the elbow axis location with the ease of a minimal skin mounted marker set. Soft tissue artefacts at the shoulder and upper arm are reduced via a coordinate transfer between dynamic calibration and the actual motion analyzed. A unique technical frame linked to markers on the forearm is defined for the humerus. The protocol has been applied to 50 subjects over a wide age range (5-85 years) and with varying physical status, proving clinical feasibility. Variability in joint centre localization in repeated measures was typically below 1 cm. Based on these estimated joint centre locations for shoulder and elbow, three shoulder joint angles together with elbow flexion and forearm pro-/supination were determined in a large set of static arm postures in 5 subjects. These were compared to synchronous universal goniometer measurements to analyse intra-tester, inter-tester, and inter-subject repeatability. Differences between the computed angles and the angles obtained directly with the goniometer remained below +/-5 degrees for joint angles up to 120 degrees and +/-10 degrees above 120 degrees.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Rettig, O. and Fradet, L. and Kasten, P. and Raiss, P. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = nov,
    year = {2009},
    keywords = {Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Biomechanics, Child, Child, Preschool, Elbow Joint/anatomy \& histology/*physiology, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Models, Anatomic, Reproducibility of Results, Shoulder Joint/anatomy \& histology/*physiology, Upper Extremity/anatomy \& histology/*physiology},
    pages = {469--76},
    annote = {Rettig, OliverFradet, LaetitiaKasten, PhilipRaiss, PatricWolf, Sebastian IengEngland2009/08/05 09:00Gait Posture. 2009 Nov;30(4):469-76. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2009.07.111. Epub 2009 Aug 3.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany.alt-title: Gait \& posturenumber: 4accession-num: 19651514}
    }
  • [DOI] S. I. Wolf, M. Alimusaj, L. Fradet, J. Siegel, and F. Braatz: „Pressure characteristics at the stump/socket interface in transtibial amputees using an adaptive prosthetic foot,“ Clin biomech (bristol, avon), vol. 24, pp. 860-5, 2009.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{wolf_pressure_2009,
    title = {Pressure characteristics at the stump/socket interface in transtibial amputees using an adaptive prosthetic foot},
    volume = {24},
    issn = {1879-1271 (Electronic) 0268-0033 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2009.08.007},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: The technological advances that have been made in developing highly functional prostheses are promising for very active patients but we do not yet know whether they cause an increase in biomechanical load along with possibly negative consequences for pressure conditions in the socket. Therefore, this study monitored the socket pressure at specific locations of the stump when using a microprocessor-controlled adaptive prosthetic ankle under different walking conditions. METHODS: Twelve unilateral transtibial amputees between 43 and 59 years of age were provided with the Proprio-Foot (Ossur) and underwent an instrumented 3D gait analysis in level, stair, and incline walking, including synchronous data capturing of socket pressure. Peak pressures and pressure time integrals (PTI) at three different locations were compared for five walking conditions with and without using the device's ankle adaptation mode. FINDINGS: Highest peak pressures of 2.4 k Pa/kg were found for incline ascent at the calf muscle as compared to 2.1 k Pa/kg in level walking with large inter-individual variance. In stair ascent a strong correlation was found between maximum knee moment and socket pressure. The most significant pressure changes relative to level walking were seen in ramp descent anteriorly towards the stump end, with PTI values being almost twice as high as those in level walking. Adapting the angle of the prosthesis on stairs and ramps modified the pressure data such that they were closer to those in level walking. INTERPRETATION: Pressure at the stump depends on the knee moments involved in each walking condition. Adapting the prosthetic ankle angle is a valuable means of modifying joint kinetics and thereby the pressure distribution at the stump. However, large inter-individual differences in local pressures underline the importance of individual socket fitting.},
    journal = {Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon)},
    author = {Wolf, S. I. and Alimusaj, M. and Fradet, L. and Siegel, J. and Braatz, F.},
    month = dec,
    year = {2009},
    keywords = {*Artificial Limbs, Adult, Amputation Stumps/physiopathology, Amputees, Biomechanics, Foot, Gait, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Middle Aged, Pressure, Prosthesis Fitting, Tibia/*physiopathology, Walking/*physiology, Weight-Bearing},
    pages = {860--5},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Germany. Sebastian.Wolf@ok.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: Clinical biomechanicsnumber: 10accession-num: 19744755},
    annote = {Wolf, Sebastian IAlimusaj, MerkurFradet, LaetitiaSiegel, JohannesBraatz, FrankengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEnglandBristol, Avon2009/09/12 06:00Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon). 2009 Dec;24(10):860-5. doi: 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2009.08.007. Epub 2009 Sep 9.}
    }
  • [DOI] S. I. Wolf, L. Fradet, and O. Rettig: „Conjunct rotation: Codman’s paradox revisited,“ Med biol eng comput, vol. 47, pp. 551-6, 2009.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{wolf_conjunct_2009,
    title = {Conjunct rotation: {Codman}'s paradox revisited},
    volume = {47},
    issn = {1741-0444 (Electronic) 0140-0118 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1007/s11517-009-0484-6},
    abstract = {This contribution mathematically formalizes Codman's idea of conjunct rotation, a term he used in 1934 to describe a paradoxical phenomenon arising from a closed-loop arm movement. Real (axial) rotation is distinguished from conjunct rotation. For characterizing the latter, the idea of reference vector fields is developed to define the neutral axial position of the humerus for any given orientation of its long axis. This concept largely avoids typical coordinate singularities arising from decomposition of 3D joint motion and therefore can be used for postural (axial) assessment of the shoulder joint both clinically and in sports science in almost the complete accessible range of motion. The concept, even though algebraic rather complex, might help to get an easier and more intuitive understanding of axial rotation of the shoulder in complex movements present in daily life and in sports.},
    journal = {Med Biol Eng Comput},
    author = {Wolf, S. I. and Fradet, L. and Rettig, O.},
    month = may,
    year = {2009},
    keywords = {*Models, Biological, Humans, Movement/physiology, Range of Motion, Articular/*physiology, Rotation, Shoulder Joint/*physiology},
    pages = {551--6},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Orthopadische Universitatsklinik Heidelberg, University of Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. sebastian.wolf@ok.uni-hd.dealt-title: Medical \& biological engineering \& computingnumber: 5accession-num: 19396487},
    annote = {Wolf, Sebastian IFradet, LaetitiaRettig, Olivereng2009/04/28 09:00Med Biol Eng Comput. 2009 May;47(5):551-6. doi: 10.1007/s11517-009-0484-6. Epub 2009 Apr 25.}
    }

2008

  • [DOI] S. Wolf, J. Simon, D. Patikas, W. Schuster, P. Armbrust, and L. Doderlein: „Foot motion in children shoes: a comparison of barefoot walking with shod walking in conventional and flexible shoes,“ Gait posture, vol. 27, pp. 51-9, 2008.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{wolf_foot_2008,
    title = {Foot motion in children shoes: a comparison of barefoot walking with shod walking in conventional and flexible shoes},
    volume = {27},
    issn = {0966-6362 (Print) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2007.01.005},
    abstract = {The increased prevalence for flatfoot and hallux valgus in modern societies may be the consequence of inadequate footwear in childhood. Based on the assumption that barefoot walking represents the best condition for the development of a healthy foot the objective of this study was to monitor the influence of commercial footwear on children's foot motion during walking. Furthermore, an attempt was made to reduce this influence by changing the physical properties of standard footwear. Children's barefoot motion pattern was monitored by a marker-based optical 3D-tracking method using a multi-segment foot model. In the study's first stage, barefoot walking was compared to walking with a commercial product. In the second stage it was compared to both, the pattern with the commercial product and with the shoe modified on the basis of the findings of the first stage of the study. Eighteen children (8.2+/-0.7 years old) with no foot deformity and with the same shoe size were recruited for this study. It was found that tibio-talar ROM increased in the commercial shoe (26.6 degrees ) compared to the barefoot condition (22.5 degrees , p=0.001) whereas the medial arch changes for push-off were diminished since the variation in arch length was reduced from 9.9\% (barefoot) to 5.9\% (shoe, p{\textless}0.001). Further, ROM in foot torsion along the long foot axis was reduced from 9.8 degrees (bare) to 4.7 degrees (shoe, p{\textless}0.001). These parameters could be improved with more flexible footwear. The present study shows that slimmer and more flexible children's shoes do not change foot motion as much as conventional shoes and therefore should be recommended not only for children in this age but for healthy children in general.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Wolf, S. and Simon, J. and Patikas, D. and Schuster, W. and Armbrust, P. and Doderlein, L.},
    month = jan,
    year = {2008},
    keywords = {*Shoes/classification, Ankle Joint/physiology, Biomechanics, Child, Equipment Design, Female, Foot/*physiology, Forefoot, Human/physiology, Hallux/physiology, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional/instrumentation, Knee Joint/physiology, Male, Movement, Optics and Photonics/instrumentation, Pliability, Prospective Studies, Range of Motion, Articular/physiology, Supination/physiology, Tibia/physiology, Torsion, Mechanical, Walking/*physiology},
    pages = {51--9},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118, Heidelberg, Germany. Sebastian.Wolf@ok.uni-hd.dealt-title: Gait \& posturenumber: 1accession-num: 17353125},
    annote = {Wolf, SebastianSimon, JanPatikas, DimitriosSchuster, WaltraudArmbrust, PetraDoderlein, LeonhardengComparative StudyResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tNetherlands2007/03/14 09:00Gait Posture. 2008 Jan;27(1):51-9. Epub 2007 Mar 13.}
    }
  • [DOI] S. I. Wolf, M. Alimusaj, O. Rettig, and L. Doderlein: „Dynamic assist by carbon fiber spring AFOs for patients with myelomeningocele,“ Gait posture, vol. 28, pp. 175-7, 2008.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{wolf_dynamic_2008,
    title = {Dynamic assist by carbon fiber spring {AFOs} for patients with myelomeningocele},
    volume = {28},
    issn = {0966-6362 (Print) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2007.11.012},
    abstract = {Patients with calf muscle insufficiency and a calcaneus gait are often dependent on ankle-foot orthoses (AFO). The orthosis is intended to improve walking and posture and should prevent structural deformities. AFOs are often manufactured with a dorsiflexion stop. The design of this type of orthosis has been investigated in several previous studies. In the current study, orthoses with a dorsal carbon fiber spring were compared with the classic design. Five patients with Spina Bifida took part in the current study. All participants underwent a 3D gait analysis including kinematic (VICON infrared cameras) and kinetic (Kistler force plates) data collection. The measurements showed that the carbon spring was able to support the patient during the complete stance phase. It was found that the use of a carbon fiber spring significantly increases the energy return during the 3rd rocker, simulating the natural push-off action (p{\textless}0.05). Via a simple mechanical test, the contribution of the carbon spring to the overall kinetics could be estimated proving that the spring does assist the patient for push-off. The more physiological ankle and knee kinematics implies a functional improvement from the carbon springs compared to classic orthosis. This investigation showed, further, that in the fitting process a neutral alignment with the shoe wear has to be carefully checked since the spring kinematics and kinetics during stance phase were influenced significantly by the alignment. Further studies are needed to assess the clinical outcome and to prove the functional benefit of this kind of orthosis.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Wolf, S. I. and Alimusaj, M. and Rettig, O. and Doderlein, L.},
    month = jul,
    year = {2008},
    keywords = {*Orthotic Devices, Adolescent, Adult, Ankle, Carbon, Equipment Design, Female, Foot, Gait/physiology, Humans, Male, Meningomyelocele/*rehabilitation},
    pages = {175--7},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Germany. Sebastian.Wolf@ok.uni-hd.dealt-title: Gait \& posturenumber: 1accession-num: 18255293},
    annote = {Wolf, Sebastian IAlimusaj, MerkurRettig, OliverDoderlein, LeonhardengNetherlands2008/02/08 09:00Gait Posture. 2008 Jul;28(1):175-7. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2007.11.012. Epub 2008 Feb 5.}
    }

2007

  • [DOI] M. Alimusaj, I. Knie, S. Wolf, A. Fuchs, F. Braatz, and L. Doderlein: „Functional impact of carbon fiber springs in ankle-foot orthoses,“ Orthopade, vol. 36, pp. 752-6, 2007.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{alimusaj_functional_2007,
    title = {Functional impact of carbon fiber springs in ankle-foot orthoses},
    volume = {36},
    issn = {0085-4530 (Print) 0085-4530 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1007/s00132-007-1125-0},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND: Patients with calf muscle insufficiency are often dependent on ankle-foot orthoses (AFO). The orthosis should improve walking and posture and should prevent structural deformities. AFOs are usually manufactured with a dorsiflexion stop. In the current study, orthoses with a dorsal carbon fiber spring were compared with the classic design. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Five patients with spina bifida, one with poliomyelitis, and one with a tibial nerve block took part in the study. All participants underwent a 3-D gait analysis including data collection of kinematics (VICON) and kinetics (Kistler). RESULTS: It was found that the use of a carbon fiber spring significantly increases the energy return during the third rocker for a push-off effect (p{\textless}0.05). The measurements showed further that the carbon spring was able to support the patient during the complete stance phase. The analysis of the ankle and knee kinematics reveals that the spring contributes to a more physiological gait (p{\textless}0.05). CONCLUSION: This investigation showed that the use of a carbon spring and the alignment positively influenced the gait pattern during the stance phase.},
    journal = {Orthopade},
    author = {Alimusaj, M. and Knie, I. and Wolf, S. and Fuchs, A. and Braatz, F. and Doderlein, L.},
    month = aug,
    year = {2007},
    keywords = {*Carbon, *Gait, *Orthotic Devices, Adolescent, Adult, Ankle, Child, Equipment Design, Equipment Failure Analysis, Female, Foot, Gait Disorders, Neurologic/*diagnosis/*rehabilitation, Humans, Male, Recovery of Function},
    pages = {752--6},
    annote = {Alimusaj, MKnie, IWolf, SFuchs, ABraatz, FDoderlein, LgerCase ReportsEnglish AbstractGermany2007/07/20 09:00Orthopade. 2007 Aug;36(8):752-6.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Ganganalyselabor, Stiftung Orthopadische Universitatsklinik Heidelberg, Heidelberg. Merkur.Alimusaj@ok.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: Der Orthopadenumber: 8orig-pub: Funktionelle Auswirkungen des Einsatzes von Karbonfedern bei Unterschenkelorthesen.accession-num: 17639337}
    }
  • [DOI] T. Dreher, S. Wolf, F. Braatz, D. Patikas, and L. Doderlein: „Internal rotation gait in spastic diplegia–critical considerations for the femoral derotation osteotomy,“ Gait posture, vol. 26, pp. 25-31, 2007.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{dreher_internal_2007,
    title = {Internal rotation gait in spastic diplegia--critical considerations for the femoral derotation osteotomy},
    volume = {26},
    issn = {0966-6362 (Print) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2006.07.018},
    abstract = {The purpose of this study was to assess under- and overcorrection following femoral derotation osteotomy (FDO) in spastic diplegic children with functionally compromising internally rotated gait, especially with respect to asymmetry. A total of 30 children with spastic diplegia and internally rotated gait underwent multilevel surgery including FDO and were assessed pre- and 1 year postoperatively by clinical examination and instrumented gait analysis. The amount of derotation was determined intra-operatively based on the neutral midpoint between passive internal and external hip rotation and was controlled with K-wires. Sixteen patients showed an asymmetry in mean hip rotation in stance of more than 10 degrees preoperatively. Accordingly, all legs were classified as the more or the less involved side. Improvement parameters were established for the evaluation of over- and undercorrection. For the clinical midpoint, no significant difference in change and improvement was found between the sides. The mean hip rotation in stance improved significantly in the more involved side with few incidences of mal-correction (13\%). The less involved side, however, got worse due to a high occurrence of over- and undercorrections (59\%). Hence the clinical midpoint as indication criterion does not give sufficient information about the functional alignment of the distal femur during gait, especially in legs with mild involvement. The study underlines the importance of gait analysis for indication in addition to the clinical midpoint. Taking into account the precision of gait analysis data and derotation amount, we suggest FDO to be carried out if the mean internal hip rotation in stance exceeds 15 degrees .},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Dreher, T. and Wolf, S. and Braatz, F. and Patikas, D. and Doderlein, L.},
    month = jun,
    year = {2007},
    keywords = {*Osteotomy, Adult, Cerebral Palsy/*physiopathology/*surgery, Child, Female, Femur/*surgery, Gait/*physiology, Hip/physiology, Humans, Male, Rotation, Treatment Outcome},
    pages = {25--31},
    annote = {Dreher, TWolf, SBraatz, FPatikas, DDoderlein, LengNetherlands2006/10/03 09:00Gait Posture. 2007 Jun;26(1):25-31. Epub 2006 Sep 28.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Germany.alt-title: Gait \& posturenumber: 1accession-num: 17010611}
    }
  • [DOI] D. Patikas, S. I. Wolf, W. Schuster, P. Armbrust, T. Dreher, and L. Doderlein: „Electromyographic patterns in children with cerebral palsy: do they change after surgery?,“ Gait posture, vol. 26, pp. 362-71, 2007.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{patikas_electromyographic_2007,
    title = {Electromyographic patterns in children with cerebral palsy: do they change after surgery?},
    volume = {26},
    issn = {0966-6362 (Print) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2006.10.012},
    abstract = {The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in electromyographic (EMG) patterns after multilevel surgical treatment in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Children with diplegia (n=18) and hemiplegia (n=16) aging from 6 to 16 years participated in the study. Twenty healthy children within the same age span are presented as reference. Gait analysis and surface electromyograms of seven major lower limb muscles were assessed before and 1-5 years after the multilevel surgery. The most frequent procedures were equinus correction, distal rectus femoris transfer, femoral derotation osteotomy and hamstrings lengthening. The results showed that the EMG pattern of the soleus, lateral gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles became closer to normal after the surgery, while no differences were detected between diplegic and hemiplegic patients. Furthermore, a subgroup of 10 patients showed an increase in medial hamstrings activation during preswing that decreased postoperatively. These findings indicate that changes in EMG patterns should not be ruled out after surgical treatment, although the extent of these changes is limited compared to changes in the kinematics. Abnormal muscle activation before the operation can be related to a compensatory response in some patients and this can be manipulated after surgery.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Patikas, D. and Wolf, S. I. and Schuster, W. and Armbrust, P. and Dreher, T. and Doderlein, L.},
    month = sep,
    year = {2007},
    keywords = {*Electromyography, Adolescent, Cerebral Palsy/*physiopathology/surgery, Child, Equinus Deformity/surgery, Female, Femur/surgery, Humans, Leg/physiology, Male, Osteotomy, Postoperative Period, Thigh/physiology, Walking/*physiology},
    pages = {362--71},
    annote = {Patikas, DWolf, S ISchuster, WArmbrust, PDreher, TDoderlein, LengNetherlands2006/12/05 09:00Gait Posture. 2007 Sep;26(3):362-71. Epub 2006 Nov 30.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Germany. dpatikas@phed.auth.gralt-title: Gait \& posturenumber: 3accession-num: 17140796}
    }
  • [DOI] P. Raiss, O. Rettig, S. Wolf, M. Loew, and P. Kasten: „Range of motion of shoulder and elbow in activities of daily life in 3d motion analysis,“ Z orthop unfall, vol. 145, pp. 493-8, 2007.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{raiss_range_2007,
    title = {Range of motion of shoulder and elbow in activities of daily life in 3D motion analysis},
    volume = {145},
    issn = {1864-6697 (Print) 1864-6697 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1055/s-2007-965468},
    abstract = {AIM: Three-dimensional motion analysis of the lower limb has been an approved method of diagnosis and therapy planning for several years. In this study we observed the range of motion of the shoulder and elbow in 10 activities of daily life (ADL) with a marker-based biomechanical model for the upper extremity. With this database we hope to improve the evaluation of different handicaps of the upper limb. METHOD: The used biomechanical model is based on 14 infrared light-reflecting markers. The ranges of motion in ADL for shoulder and elbow were measured in a standardised case setting in seven test persons with a mean age of 25 years (SD 15 years). The 10 observed ADL were eating with a spoon, combing hair, genital hygiene, using a telephone, typing on a keyboard, drinking from a glass, turning a key, turning a page, pouring water in a glass and drawing. RESULTS: For the ten explored ADL, the test persons needed a range of motion in the shoulder of 91 - 0 - 9 degrees (total 100 degrees) flexion/extension, 112 - 23 - 0 degrees (total 89 degrees) abduction/adduction, and 91 - 0 - 114 degrees (total 205 degrees) external/internal rotation. Most of the ADL were performed in external rotation and, excluding the motion genital hygiene, the test persons only needed an internal rotation of 10 degrees. Maximal shoulder flexion was used with opening a door, the minimum was reached with genital hygiene. The maximum angles of abduction and rotation were reached with combing hair and the minimum values were reached with genital hygiene. To perform the ADL, an elbow extension/flexion of 0 - 36 - 146 degrees (total 110 degrees), and 55 - 0 - 72 degrees (total 127 degrees) pro-/supination was needed. Maximal pronation was reached with "pour from a pitcher". Maximal supination was present with genital hygiene. CONCLUSIONS: The decisive benefit of 3D motion analysis is the exact capturing of complex and dynamic movements at any time. Therefore, not only static joint positions can be recorded, but also the dynamic course of a movement can be traced. By using our model on every day movements, we were able to collect data that can serve as the basis for the desired range of motion of the upper extremities in patients.},
    journal = {Z Orthop Unfall},
    author = {Raiss, P. and Rettig, O. and Wolf, S. and Loew, M. and Kasten, P.},
    month = aug,
    year = {2007},
    keywords = {*Activities of Daily Living, Computer Simulation, Elbow Joint/anatomy \& histology/*physiology, Humans, Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted/*methods, Imaging, Three-Dimensional/*methods, Models, Biological, Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods, Range of Motion, Articular/*physiology, Shoulder Joint/anatomy \& histology/*physiology, Whole Body Imaging/*methods},
    pages = {493--8},
    annote = {Raiss, PRettig, OWolf, SLoew, MKasten, PgerEnglish AbstractGermany2007/10/04 09:00Z Orthop Unfall. 2007 Jul-Aug;145(4):493-8.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Schulter/Ellenbogen, Orthopadische Universitatsklinik Heidelberg. patric.raiss@ok.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: Zeitschrift fur Orthopadie und Unfallchirurgienumber: 4orig-pub: Das Bewegungsausmass der Schulter und des Ellenbogens bei Alltagsbewegungen in der 3D-Bewegungsanalyse.accession-num: 17912671}
    }
  • J. R. Simon, M. Alimusaj, and S. I. Wolf: „Kinetics on ramps and stairs using floor level mounted force plates,“ Gait and posture, vol. 26, p. S11–S12, 2007.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{simon_kinetics_2007,
    title = {Kinetics on ramps and stairs using floor level mounted force plates},
    volume = {26},
    journal = {Gait and Posture},
    author = {Simon, J. R. and Alimusaj, M. and Wolf, S. I.},
    year = {2007},
    pages = {S11--S12},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:number: Ssection: S11}
    }

2006

  • [DOI] D. Patikas, S. I. Wolf, P. Armbrust, K. Mund, W. Schuster, T. Dreher, and L. Doderlein: „Effects of a postoperative resistive exercise program on the knee extension and flexion torque in children with cerebral palsy: a randomized clinical trial,“ Arch phys med rehabil, vol. 87, pp. 1161-9, 2006.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{patikas_effects_2006,
    title = {Effects of a postoperative resistive exercise program on the knee extension and flexion torque in children with cerebral palsy: a randomized clinical trial},
    volume = {87},
    issn = {0003-9993 (Print) 0003-9993 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.apmr.2006.05.014},
    abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of resistive exercise on the knee extension and flexion torque production during the rehabilitation period after multilevel orthopedic surgery. DESIGN: Randomized clinical trial. SETTING: Hospital rehabilitation department. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-nine children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP) (age range, 6-16 y), randomly allocated to an exercise group (n=19) and a control group (n=20). All received conventional physiotherapy (PT), and the exercise group also followed a resistive exercise program. INTERVENTION: A 9-month standardized home-based resistive exercise program, which started about 3 months after the surgery. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The Gross Motor Functional Measurement (GMFM) assessed before (E(0)) and 1 year (E(1)) after the surgery. The Modified Ashworth Scale and the isometric and isokinetic torque of the knee extensors and flexors were evaluated at E(0), E(1), and 6 months after the surgery. RESULTS: The knee extension and flexion moments had decreased 6 months after the surgery and recovered to the preoperative level 1 year after surgery. These changes were not group dependent. CONCLUSIONS: Additional long-term, home-based, low-cost resistive exercise that starts soon after the operation of patients with CP was not more beneficial than conventional PT only, in terms of strength and GMFM.},
    journal = {Arch Phys Med Rehabil},
    author = {Patikas, D. and Wolf, S. I. and Armbrust, P. and Mund, K. and Schuster, W. and Dreher, T. and Doderlein, L.},
    month = sep,
    year = {2006},
    keywords = {Adolescent, Cerebral Palsy/*rehabilitation/surgery, Child, Exercise Therapy/*methods, Female, Humans, Knee/surgery, Male, Postoperative Period, Range of Motion, Articular, Walking},
    pages = {1161--9},
    annote = {Patikas, DimitriosWolf, Sebastian IArmbrust, PetraMund, KatrinSchuster, WaltraudDreher, ThomasDoderlein, LeonhardengRandomized Controlled Trial2006/08/29 09:00Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2006 Sep;87(9):1161-9.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Germany. Dimitrios.Patikas@ok.uni-hd.dealt-title: Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitationnumber: 9accession-num: 16935049}
    }
  • [DOI] D. Patikas, S. I. Wolf, K. Mund, P. Armbrust, W. Schuster, and L. Doderlein: „Effects of a postoperative strength-training program on the walking ability of children with cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial,“ Arch phys med rehabil, vol. 87, pp. 619-26, 2006.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{patikas_effects_2006-1,
    title = {Effects of a postoperative strength-training program on the walking ability of children with cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial},
    volume = {87},
    issn = {0003-9993 (Print) 0003-9993 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.apmr.2006.01.023},
    abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of a postoperative strength-training program on the walking of children with cerebral palsy (CP). DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Hospital rehabilitation department. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-nine children with CP (age range, 6-16 y). After orthopedic surgery, the control group (n=20) followed a conventional physiotherapy (PT) program, and the strength-training group (n=19) followed a strength-training program in addition to the conventional PT. Twenty-nine age-matched healthy children were used as references. INTERVENTION: A 9-month strength-training program. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Spatiotemporal, kinematic, and kinetic parameters during gait analysis were analyzed before (E0) and 1 year after (E1) the surgery. For 22 children, a 2-year postoperative gait analysis (E2) took place as well. RESULTS: At E1, several kinematic and kinetic parameters improved, although there was no significant difference between the groups. Spatiotemporal parameters showed a worsening at E1 and a recovery to preoperative values at E2. CONCLUSIONS: The examined parameters may be more substantially influenced by factors such as the surgery outcome and the variability of pathologic characteristics than by the strength-training program per se. However, a more significant effect of the strength-training may appear if more intense and short-term training protocols are used, considering factors such as patients' motivations, ages, and postoperative statuses.},
    journal = {Arch Phys Med Rehabil},
    author = {Patikas, D. and Wolf, S. I. and Mund, K. and Armbrust, P. and Schuster, W. and Doderlein, L.},
    month = may,
    year = {2006},
    keywords = {*Exercise Movement Techniques, *Physical Therapy Modalities, Adolescent, Cerebral Palsy/*rehabilitation/*surgery, Child, Gait, Humans, Muscle, Skeletal/*physiopathology, Range of Motion, Articular, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, Walking/*physiology},
    pages = {619--26},
    annote = {Patikas, DimitriosWolf, Sebastian IMund, KatrinArmbrust, PetraSchuster, WaltraudDoderlein, LeonhardengRandomized Controlled TrialResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't2006/04/26 09:00Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2006 May;87(5):619-26.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Germany. Dimitrios.Patikas@ok.uni-hd.dealt-title: Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitationnumber: 5accession-num: 16635623}
    }
  • [DOI] J. Simon, L. Doederlein, A. S. McIntosh, D. Metaxiotis, H. G. Bock, and S. I. Wolf: „The Heidelberg foot measurement method: development, description and assessment,“ Gait posture, vol. 23, pp. 411-24, 2006.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{simon_heidelberg_2006,
    title = {The {Heidelberg} foot measurement method: development, description and assessment},
    volume = {23},
    issn = {0966-6362 (Print) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2005.07.003},
    abstract = {The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a kinematic measurement method for the foot that could be applied clinically to measure foot function including all typical foot deformities. The ankle was modelled as two anatomically based hinge joints rotating around anatomical axes estimated by the use of projection angles. For the mid- and forefoot a descriptive approach was chosen by defining angles between anatomical landmarks or reference points derived from these landmarks. The motion of 17 markers on the lower leg and foot was measured during walking gait on 10 adult participants with no known abnormalities to determine the pattern of normal foot motion, assess reliability and provide a reference against which pathological foot behaviour could be compared. Functional angles for mid- and forefoot motions were developed to improve clinical applications of the data. The combination of anatomically and technically oriented marker placement on the foot is a reliable basis for reproducible kinematic measurements and the method was shown to be viable for clinical practice.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Simon, J. and Doederlein, L. and McIntosh, A. S. and Metaxiotis, D. and Bock, H. G. and Wolf, S. I.},
    month = jun,
    year = {2006},
    keywords = {*Models, Biological, Adult, Ankle Joint/physiology, Biomechanics, Foot/anatomy \& histology/*physiology, Foot Deformities/physiopathology, Gait/*physiology, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Movement/physiology, Reproducibility of Results, Video Recording, Walking},
    pages = {411--24},
    annote = {Simon, JDoederlein, LMcIntosh, A SMetaxiotis, DBock, H GWolf, S IengEvaluation StudiesResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tNetherlands2005/09/15 09:00Gait Posture. 2006 Jun;23(4):411-24. Epub 2005 Sep 12.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Interdisciplinary Centre for Scientific Computation, Heidelberg (IWR), Im Neuenheimer Feld 368, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.alt-title: Gait \& posturenumber: 4accession-num: 16157483}
    }
  • [DOI] S. Wolf, T. Loose, M. Schablowski, L. Doderlein, R. Rupp, H. J. Gerner, G. Bretthauer, and R. Mikut: „Automated feature assessment in instrumented gait analysis,“ Gait posture, vol. 23, pp. 331-8, 2006.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{wolf_automated_2006,
    title = {Automated feature assessment in instrumented gait analysis},
    volume = {23},
    issn = {0966-6362 (Print) 0966-6362 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2005.04.004},
    abstract = {A methodological modular framework is presented for automated assessment of gait patterns. The processing steps of data selection, gait parameter calculation and evaluation are not limited to a specific field of application and are largely independent of case-based clinical expert knowledge. For these steps, a variety of mathematical methods was used and the validity of the approach to assess gait parameters tested by applying it to the clinical problem of Botulinum Toxin A (BTX-A) treatment of the spastic equinus foot. A set of 3670 parameters was ranked by relevance for classification of a group of 42 diplegic cerebral palsy (CP) patients and an age-matched reference group. The same procedure was performed for pre- and post-therapeutic data sets of these patients. Gait parameters of high relevance coincided well with results of previous studies based on partly manual and more subjective parameter selection. A norm distance measure is introduced to facilitate the quantification of deviations from a normal walking pattern and can be used as an overall scalar measure to evaluate differences in gait patterns or as a set of measures attributing each joint angle separately.},
    journal = {Gait Posture},
    author = {Wolf, S. and Loose, T. and Schablowski, M. and Doderlein, L. and Rupp, R. and Gerner, H. J. and Bretthauer, G. and Mikut, R.},
    month = apr,
    year = {2006},
    keywords = {*Automation, Botulinum Toxins, Type A/*therapeutic use, Cerebral Palsy/*physiopathology, Child, Equinus Deformity/*physiopathology, Female, Gait Disorders, Neurologic/*drug therapy/*physiopathology, Humans, Male, Muscle Spasticity/*drug therapy/*physiopathology, Neuromuscular Agents/*therapeutic use},
    pages = {331--8},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Orthopadische Universitatsklinik Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200a, D-69118 Heidelberg, Germany. Sebastian.Wolf@ok.uni-hd.dealt-title: Gait \& posturenumber: 3accession-num: 15955701},
    annote = {Wolf, SebastianLoose, TobiasSchablowski, MatthiasDoderlein, LeonhardRupp, RudigerGerner, Hans JurgenBretthauer, GeorgMikut, RalfengNetherlands2005/06/16 09:00Gait Posture. 2006 Apr;23(3):331-8. Epub 2005 Jun 13.}
    }

2005

  • [DOI] D. Patikas, S. Wolf, and L. Doderlein: „Electromyographic evaluation of the sound and involved side during gait of spastic hemiplegic children with cerebral palsy,“ Eur j neurol, vol. 12, pp. 691-9, 2005.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{patikas_electromyographic_2005,
    title = {Electromyographic evaluation of the sound and involved side during gait of spastic hemiplegic children with cerebral palsy},
    volume = {12},
    issn = {1351-5101 (Print) 1351-5101 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1111/j.1468-1331.2005.01047.x},
    abstract = {The purpose of this study was to investigate the surface electromyogram (EMG) of the lower limbs of hemiplegic children with spastic cerebral palsy during gait. The EMG of seven muscles was analyzed for 17 children (5-12 years old). The EMG of the involved side was decreased for the examined shank muscles and increased for the hamstrings, during certain phases of the gait cycle, compared with the sound side. The rectus femoris of the involved side showed prolonged activation during the swing phase. The enhanced activation of the hamstrings may be beneficial/compensatory, preventing knee hyperextension. The presence of equinus foot obstructs the foot clearance and hence the prolonged rectus femoris EMG activity during the swing phase may contribute to shorten the lower limb by flexing the hip. Possible compensatory mechanisms of the proximal muscles of the involved lower limb that can be measured with instrumented gait analysis should be taken into account before the decision for a specific treatment.},
    journal = {Eur J Neurol},
    author = {Patikas, D. and Wolf, S. and Doderlein, L.},
    month = sep,
    year = {2005},
    keywords = {*Electromyography, Adolescent, Biomechanics/methods, Cerebral Palsy/*physiopathology, Child, Female, Functional Laterality/*physiology, Gait/*physiology, Hemiplegia/*physiopathology, Humans, Male, Muscle, Skeletal/physiopathology},
    pages = {691--9},
    annote = {Patikas, DWolf, SDoderlein, LengComparative StudyEvaluation StudiesEngland2005/09/01 09:00Eur J Neurol. 2005 Sep;12(9):691-9.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. dimitrios.patikas@ok.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: European journal of neurology : the official journal of the European Federation of Neurological Societiesnumber: 9accession-num: 16128870}
    }

2004

  • [DOI] L. Doderlein and S. Wolf: „The value of instrumented gait analysis in infantile cerebral palsy,“ Orthopade, vol. 33, pp. 1103-18, 2004.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{doderlein_value_2004,
    title = {The value of instrumented gait analysis in infantile cerebral palsy},
    volume = {33},
    issn = {0085-4530 (Print) 0085-4530 (Linking)},
    doi = {10.1007/s00132-004-0681-9},
    abstract = {The technique of instrumented gait analysis enables the physician to exactly document spastic gait disorders. Time-distance parameters, joint kinematics and kinetics, dynamic EMG recordings and the measurement of energy consumption provide an extensive insight into gait problems. This method is used not only for diagnostic purposes but also to monitor the effects of therapeutic interventions. A significant limitation is the specialist knowledge necessary to interpret the data. For an adequate assessment, the gait data must be supplemented by clinical and radiological findings. When interpreting gait analysis reports, technical errors must always be born in mind. The subjectivity of individual interpretation is the major reason for the considerable variability in the treatment recommendations for similar patients.},
    language = {ger},
    journal = {Orthopade},
    author = {Doderlein, L. and Wolf, S.},
    month = oct,
    year = {2004},
    keywords = {Adolescent, Biomechanics, Cerebral Palsy/ physiopathology/therapy, Child, Electromyography, Female, Gait Disorders, Neurologic/ diagnosis, Gait/ physiology, Humans, Male, Terminology as Topic},
    pages = {1103--18},
    annote = {Doderlein, LWolf, SComparative StudyEnglish AbstractGermanyOrthopade. 2004 Oct;33(10):1103-18.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Abteilung Orthopadie und Rehabilitation, Stiftung Orthopadische Universitatsklinik Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. leonhard.doederlein@ok.uni-heidelberg.dealt-title: Der Orthopadenumber: 10edition: 2004/07/20orig-pub: Der Stellenwert der instrumentellen Ganganalyse bei der infantilen Zerebralparese.accession-num: 15258733remote-database-provider: NLM}
    }
  • D. Metaxiotis, S. Wolf, and L. Doederlein: „Conversion of biarticular to monoarticular muscles as a component of multilevel surgery in spastic diplegia,“ J bone joint surg br, vol. 86, pp. 102-9, 2004.
    [Mehr…]
    @article{metaxiotis_conversion_2004,
    title = {Conversion of biarticular to monoarticular muscles as a component of multilevel surgery in spastic diplegia},
    volume = {86},
    issn = {0301-620X (Print) 0301-620X (Linking)},
    abstract = {We treated 20 children (40 limbs) with diplegic cerebral palsy who could walk by multilevel soft tissue operative procedures including conversion of the biarticular semitendinosus and gastrocnemius to monoarticular muscles. The mean age at surgery was 11.5 years (5.6 to 17.0). All patients underwent clinical and radiological examination and three-dimensional instrumented gait analysis before and at a mean of 3.1 years (2.0 to 4.5) after surgery. The passive range of movement at the ankle, knee and hip showed improvement at follow-up. Kinematic parameters indicated a reduced pelvic range of movement and improvement of extension of the knee in single stance after operation (p {\textless} 0.0001). However, post-operative back-kneeing was detected in five of the 40 limbs. The kinetic studies showed that the power of the hamstrings and plantar flexors of the ankle was maintained while the maximum knee extensor moment during stance was reduced. The elimination of knee flexor activity of semitendinosus and gastrocnemius combined with transfer of distal rectus femoris led to an improvement in gait as confirmed by gait analysis.},
    journal = {J Bone Joint Surg Br},
    author = {Metaxiotis, D. and Wolf, S. and Doederlein, L.},
    month = jan,
    year = {2004},
    keywords = {Adolescent, Ankle Joint/physiology, Cerebral Palsy/physiopathology/*surgery, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Gait, Hip Joint/physiology, Humans, Knee Joint/physiology, Male, Movement Disorders/physiopathology/*surgery, Muscle, Skeletal/physiology/*surgery, Postoperative Care/methods, Prospective Studies, Range of Motion, Articular},
    pages = {102--9},
    annote = {Metaxiotis, DWolf, SDoederlein, LengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEngland2004/02/10 05:00J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2004 Jan;86(1):102-9.},
    annote = {The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:auth-address: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200A, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany.alt-title: The Journal of bone and joint surgery. British volumenumber: 1accession-num: 14765875}
    }